Fear of Persecution: Global Human Rights, International Law, and Human Well-being

Front Cover
James Daniel White, Anthony J. Marsella
Lexington Books, 2007 - Political Science - 295 pages
Fear of Persecution offers an absorbing and necessary overview of the plight of internally displaced people (IDPs) and refugees. Every year there are tens of millions of people around the world who have fled or are in flight due to the fear of persecution based upon race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, and who then become invisible. James D. White and Anthony J. Marsella bring together essays that address issues emerging from the current relationship of international law, human rights, and refugee health and well-being. This book discusses and critically analyzes the evolvement of international responses and NGO's, the influence of the East/West cultural binary, and possible frameworks for peace-building efforts. White and Marsella provide a unique interdisciplinary approach to a complex subject, mixing the views of leading academics, policy analysts, senior officials from NGOS, and lawyers to consider the situation from various angles. Fear of Persecution is a compelling and comprehensive text that is sure to stimulate debate among political theorists and those interested in international relations.
 

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Contents

III
15
IV
33
V
59
VI
75
VII
93
VIII
109
IX
129
X
149
XII
177
XIII
189
XIV
225
XV
237
XVI
257
XVII
279
XVIII
287
XIX
291

XI
151

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Popular passages

Page 1 - January 1951 and owing to well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country...
Page 7 - All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

About the author (2007)

James D. White is Associate Director, International Programs, Center for Advanced Communications Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology. Anthony J. Marsella is Professor Emeritus of the Department of Psychology at the University of Hawai'i.

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