Embassytown: A Novel

Front Cover
Random House Publishing Group, May 17, 2011 - Fiction - 368 pages
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

In the far future, humans have colonized a distant planet, home to the enigmatic Ariekei, sentient beings famed for a language unique in the universe, one that only a few altered human ambassadors can speak. Avice Benner Cho, a human colonist, has returned to Embassytown after years of deep-space adventure. She cannot speak the Ariekei tongue, but she is an indelible part of it, having long ago been made a figure of speech, a living simile in their language. When distant political machinations deliver a new ambassador to Arieka, the fragile equilibrium between humans and aliens is violently upset. Catastrophe looms, and Avice is torn between competing loyalties: to a husband she no longer loves, to a system she no longer trusts, and to her place in a language she cannot speak—but which speaks through her, whether she likes it or not.

Praise for Embassytown

“A breakneck tale of suspense . . . disturbing and beautiful by turns. I cannot emphasize enough how terrific this novel is. It's definitely one of the best books I've read in the past year, perfectly balanced between escapism and otherworldly philosophizing.”—io9

Embassytown is a fully achieved work of art. . . . Works on every level, providing compulsive narrative, splendid intellectual rigour and risk, moral sophistication, fine verbal fireworks and sideshows, and even the old-fashioned satisfaction of watching a protagonist become more of a person than she gave promise of being.”—Ursula K Le Guin

 “The Kafkaesque writer journeys to the distant edges of the universe in his latest sci-fi thriller.”—Entertainment Weekly

“Utterly astonishing . . . A major intellectual achievement.”—Kirkus Reviews

“Brilliant storytelling . . . The result is a world masterfully wrecked and rebuilt.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - livingtech - LibraryThing

Essentially, I think China Mieville does a great job at making things seem alien. This novel, like many of his that I've read, mostly takes place in an environment (far future planet/universe) that ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - technodiabla - LibraryThing

Wow! That was a ride. It took me many weeks to read Embassytown and I think it was worth it. In a very far future in another galaxy humans have colonized a remote planet with sentient, advanced ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
9
Section 2
18
Section 3
28
Section 4
43
Section 5
49
Section 6
59
Section 7
66
Section 8
86
Section 23
175
Section 24
184
Section 25
192
Section 26
203
Section 27
211
Section 28
218
Section 29
227
Section 30
238

Section 9
93
Section 10
96
Section 11
101
Section 12
104
Section 13
108
Section 14
114
Section 15
118
Section 16
124
Section 17
131
Section 18
139
Section 19
143
Section 20
148
Section 21
154
Section 22
172
Section 31
243
Section 32
251
Section 33
264
Section 34
272
Section 35
278
Section 36
287
Section 37
299
Section 38
306
Section 39
311
Section 40
315
Section 41
327
Section 42
335
Section 43
338
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

China Miéville is the author of several books, including Perdido Street Station, The City & The City, and Kraken. His works have won the Hugo, the British Science Fiction Award (twice), the Arthur C. Clarke Award (three times) and the World Fantasy Award. He lives and works in London.

Bibliographic information