Memoir of Henry Augustus Ingalls ...

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Page 96 - So live, that when thy summons comes to join The innumerable caravan, that moves To that mysterious realm, where each shall take His chamber in the silent halls of death, Thou go not, like the quarry slave at night, Scourged to his dungeon, but, sustained and soothed By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave, Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams.
Page 40 - Thou shalt rise up before the hoary head, and honor the face of the old man, and fear thy God: I am the LORD.
Page 100 - ... them an interest in every species of being which surrounds them; and, amid the hours of curiosity and delight, to awaken those latent feelings of benevolence and of sympathy, from which all the moral or intellectual greatness of man finally arises. It is to lay the foundation of an early and of a manly piety: amid the magnificent system of material signs in which they reside, to give them the mighty key which can interpret them; and to make them look upon the universe which they inhabit, not...
Page 7 - But a righteous man, though he die before his time, shall be at rest. For honourable old age is not that which standeth in length of time, nor is its measure given by number of years : but understanding is gray hairs unto men, and an unspotted life is ripe old age.
Page 99 - While it opens to the years of infancy or youth a source of pure and of permanent enjoyment, it has consequences on the character and happiness of future life, which they are unable to foresee. It is to provide them, amid all the agitations and trials of society, with one gentle and unreproaching friend, whose voice is ever in alliance with goodness and virtue, and which, when once understood, is able both to sooth misfortune, and to reclaim from folly.
Page 85 - We are born with faculties and powers capable almost of any thing, such at least as would carry us farther than can easily be imagined : but it is only the exercise of those powers, which gives us ability and skill in any thing, and leads us towards perfection.
Page 99 - It is to provide them, amid all the agitations and trials of society, with one gentle and unreproaching friend, whose voice is ever in alliance with goodness and virtue, and which, when once understood, is able both to soothe misfortune, and to reclaim from folly. It is to identify them with the happiness of that nature to which they belong ; to give them an interest in every species of being which surrounds them ; and, amid the hours of curiosity and delight, to awaken those latent The study of...
Page 79 - Art is long and time is fleeting, And our hearts, though stout and brave, Still like muffled drums are beating Funeral marches to the grave.
Page 128 - We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness; and that to secure these rights governments are instituted among men deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.
Page 71 - Oct. 6th. 1863, the following resolutions were passed— WHEREAS, it has pleased Almighty God, in...

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