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OF

HENRY AUGUSTUS INGALLS.

BY

REV. GEORGE W. BURNAP,

PASTOR OF THE FIRST INDEPENDENT CHURCH OF BALTIMORE.

WITH

SELECTIONS FROM HIS WRITINGS.

"None knew him but to love him,

None named him but to praise.” Halleck.

BOSTON:

JAMES MUNROE AND COMPANY.

1846.

1

1

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1846, by

JAMES MUNROE AND COMPANY, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.

BOSTON:

PRINTED BY THURSTON, TORRY AND CO.

31 Devonshire Street.

Y91
1442
B963m

PREFACE.

The Committee, appointed by the MeTROPOLITAN AssocIATION to make a selection from the writings of our late fellow member, HENRY A. INGALLS, and with it publish a Memoir of him, submit the present volume as the result of their labors.

For the Memoir, we are indebted to the Reverend GEORGE W. BURNAP, of Baltimore. It is a beautiful and appropriate tribute to departed worth; for it we tender to the author our grateful acknowledgments.

With regard to the selections, it is not intended to submit them to the “unfeeling ordeal of criticism.” Many of them were written at an early period of Mr. Ingalls's life, for his own amusement and improvement; and all, with perhaps one or two exceptions, were, undoubtedly, never thought of for publication.

The object of the following publication is, simply, to embody in an enduring form, the memorials which are left in his writings, and the recollections of his friends, of the mind and character of a young man, distinguished for moral and intellectual attainment. The Association which undertook the enterprise, were desirous to possess, individually, the means of recalling more vividly the image of their departed friend, and thus of kindling within themselves an ever-renewing desire of that excellence which they admired in him. They wished to rescue from oblivion the memory of one, whose example is calculated both to stimulate and encourage the young in all that is good. They felt, too, that the benefit would not be confined to themselves : for whoever should thus learn his early development both of mind and character, would be reminded of his own powers and responsibilities, and be exhorted" to go and do likewise.” They would have it manifest, that the opinion too prevalent among young men, that virtue, morality and honor, go unob

served and unappreciated, and consequently there is one reason less for their being practised, is erroneous; as the affection of every member of our Association for the memory of our departed friend, abundantly testifies.

They commend it to the attention of the young, as a plain, unvarnished tale of real life, demonstrating by facts, how much may be accomplished in a short life, directed by wisdom and sanctified by true religion.

JOHN J. ANDERSON,
L. B. HARDCASTLE,
THOMAS J. TAYLOR,
JAMES M. DRAKE,
REUBEN H. CUDLIPP,

Committee.

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