The Maxwellians

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Cornell University Press, Sep 15, 1994 - Science - 280 pages

James Clerk Maxwell published the Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism in 1873. At his death, six years later, his theory of the electromagnetic field was neither well understood nor widely accepted. By the mid-1890s, however, it was regarded as one of the most fundamental and fruitful of all physical theories. Bruce J. Hunt examines the joint work of a group of young British physicists—G. F. FitzGerald, Oliver Heaviside, and Oliver Lodge—along with a key German contributor, Heinrich Hertz. It was these "Maxwellians" who transformed the fertile but half-finished ideas presented in the Treatise into the concise and powerful system now known as "Maxwell's theory."

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 FitzGerald and Maxwells Theory
5
2 FitzGerald Lodge and Electromagnetic Waves
24
3 Heaviside the Telegrapher
48
4 Ether Models and the Vortex Sponge
73
5 Maxwell Redressed
108
6 Waves on Wires
129
7 Bath 1888
152
8 The Maxwellian Heyday
175
9 The Advent of the Electron
209
Epilogue
240
Appendix From Maxwells Equations to Maxwells Equations
245
Abbreviations
249
Bibliography
251
Index
261
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Bruce J. Hunt is Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin.

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