A dissertation on the disorder of death; or that state of the frame under the signs of death called suspended animation

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author, sold, 1819 - 480 pages

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Page 66 - Ah, dear Juliet, Why art thou yet so fair? Shall I believe That unsubstantial Death is amorous, And that the lean abhorred monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour?
Page 196 - Angels prompt her golden dreams. For her th' unfading rose of Eden blooms, And wings of Seraphs shed divine perfumes, For her the spouse prepares the bridal ring. For her white virgins Hymeneals sing, To sounds of heav'nly harps she dies away, And melts in visions of eternal day.
Page 66 - O my love ! my wife ! Death, that hath suck'd the honey of thy breath, Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty : Thou art not conquered ; beauty's ensign yet Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks, And death's pale flag is not advanced there.
Page 433 - Every muscle in his countenance was simultaneously thrown into fearful action; rage, horror, despair, anguish, and ghastly smiles, united their hideous expression in the murderer's face, surpassing far the wildest representations of a Fuseli or a Kcan.
Page 219 - ... feelings, and from which I saw no possibility of relief: when suddenly I observed at the distance of ten paces from me a figure — the figure of a deceased person. I pointed at it, and asked my wife whether she did not see it. She saw nothing, but being ;much alarmed endeavoured to compose me, and sent for the physician. The figure remained some seven or eight minutes, and at length I became a little more calm ; and as I was extremely exhausted, I soon afterwards fell into a troubled kind of...
Page 145 - We all three felt his pulse first ; it was distinct, though small and thready ; and his heart had its usual beating. He composed himself on his back, and lay in a still posture some time ; while I held his right hand, Dr. Baynard laid his hand on his heart, and Mr. Skrine held a clean lookingglass to his mouth. I found his pulse sink gradually, till at last I could not feel any by the most exact and nice touch. Dr. Baynard could not feel the least motion in...
Page 205 - Sibyllae. ventum erat ad limen, cum virgo, 'poscere fata tempus,' ait ; 'deus, ecce, deus ! ' cui talia fanti ante fores subito non vultus, non color unus, non comptae mansere comae ; sed pectus anhelum, et rabie fera corda tument ; maiorque videri nec mortale sonans, adflata est numine quando 50 iam propiore dei. ' cessas in vota precesque, Tros,' ait, ' Aenea, cessas ? neque enim ante dehiscent attonitae magna ora domus.
Page 145 - ... he could die or expire when he pleased, and yet by an effort, or somehow, he could come to life again; which he had sometimes tried before he sent for us.
Page 146 - As we were going away, we observed some motion about the body, and upon examination, found his pulse and the motion of his heart gradually returning : he began to breathe gently and speak softly...
Page 223 - ... nature, though they certainly had their origin internally ; and at the same time I was always able to distinguish with the greatest precision phantasms from phenomena. Indeed, I never once erred in this, as I was in general perfectly calm and self-collected on the occasion. I knew extremely well...

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