Creating Citizens: Political Education and Liberal Democracy

Front Cover
Clarendon Press, Sep 19, 1997 - Political Science - 272 pages
Any liberal democratic state must honour religious and cultural pluralism in its educational policies. To fail to honour them would betray ideals of freedom and toleration fundamental to liberal democracy. Yet if such ideals are to flourish from one generation to the next, allegiance to the distinctive values of liberal democracy is a necessary educational end, whose pursuit will constrain pluralism. The problem of political education is therefore to ensure the continuity across generations of the constitutive ideals of liberal democracy, while remaining hospitable to a diversity of conduct and belief that sometimes threatens those very ideals. Creating Citizens addresses this crucial problem. In lucid and elegant prose, Professor Callan, one of the world's foremost philosophers of education, identifies both the principal ends of civic education, and the rights that limit their political pursuit. This timely new study sheds light on some of the most divisive educational controversies, such as state sponsorship and regulation of denominational schooling, as well as the role of non-denominational schools in the moral and political development of children. Oxford Political Theory presents the best new work in contemporary political theory. It is intended to be broad in scope, including original contributions to political philosophy, and also work in applied political theory. The series will contain works of outstanding quality with no restriction as to approach or subject matter. The series editors are David Miller and Alan Ryan.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

EDUCATION AND THE POLITICS OF VIRTUE
1
Liberal Politics and Virtue
3
Political Virtue and Pluralism
7
Liberal Democracy and Autonomy
10
PLURALISM AND POLITICAL LIBERALISM
12
From Comprehensive to Political Liberalism
13
Varieties of Comprehensive and Political Liberalism
17
Reasonable Pluralism
21
Emotional Generosity and Historical Imagination
115
History Literature and Political Virtue
121
Whose Tradition?
123
Patriotism and Communitarianism
126
THE GREAT SPHERE AND RIGHTS
132
ParentsRights to Educational Choice
135
Childrens Needs and Parental SelfFulfilment
138
Parents and Sovereignty
145

The Political Conception of the Person
24
The Burdens of Judgement and the Limits of Diversity
28
How Burdensome are the Burdens of Judgement?
34
Political Liberalism and the Fate of Religion
36
Back to Comprehensive Liberalism
39
AUTONOMY JUSTICE AND THE GOOD
43
Political Education and Constitutional Consensus
44
Justice Without Autonomy
47
Autonomy and the Exaltation of Choice
52
Choosing and Willing
56
Simple Integrity
60
Integrity and Pluralism
61
A Modest Convergence
67
JUSTICE CARE AND COMMUNITY
70
Towards a Common Voice
71
Care and the Circumstances of Justice
78
Intimacy and Community
81
Retrieving Patriotism
87
Trust Patriotism and Pluralism
94
Two Objections
97
PATRIOTISM AND SENTIMENTALITY
100
Sentimentality and Unearned Emotion
103
Fictions of Purity and Political Vice
105
Borrowing from Plato
109
The Uncertain Role of Critical Reason
112
Children and Sovereignty
147
Sovereignty and the Limits of Autonomy
149
Filial Servility and Parental Despotism
152
Mozert Reconsidered
157
COMMON SCHOOLS SEPARATE SCHOOLS
162
Education and Schooling
163
The Separatist Argument
167
Minimalist Common Education
169
Consensus and Respect
171
Political Virtue and Common Schooling
174
Reconciling Separate and Common Education
178
Separate Schools and the Right to Educational Choice
182
Separate Schools and Tolerance
189
Who Wants Common Schools?
193
VIRTUE DIALOGUE AND THE COMMON SCHOOL
196
Moral Commitment and Character
197
Care against Truth in Dialogue
202
Moral Distress and the Limits of Care
206
Moral Belligerence and Dialogue
209
Confrontation and Conciliation
214
CONCLUSION
221
Notes
224
Bibliography
244
Index
257
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - If there is any fixed star in our constitutional constellation, it is that no official, high or petty, can prescribe what shall be orthodox in politics, nationalism, religion, or other matters of opinion or force citizens to confess by word or act their faith therein If there are any circumstances which permit an exception, they do not now occur to us.
Page 6 - That they are educating the young for citizenship is reason for scrupulous protection of Constitutional freedoms of the individual, if we are not to strangle the free mind at its source and teach youth to discount important principles of our government as mere platitudes.