National Documents: State Papers So Arranged as to Illustrate the Growth of Our Country from 1606 to the Present Day

Front Cover
Adelaide Louise Rouse
H. W. Bell, 1904 - United States - 504 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 317 - And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution upon* military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgment of mankind and the gracious favor of Almighty God.
Page 98 - Court. 10. To define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offences against the law of nations. 11. To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water. 12. To raise and support armies ; but no appropriation of money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years. 13. To provide and maintain a navy.
Page 99 - Person. (2) The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it. (3) No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed. (4) No Capitation, or other direct, tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to the Census or Enumeration herein before directed to be taken.
Page 98 - To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes; (4) To establish an uniform Rule of Naturalization, and uniform Laws on the subject of Bankruptcies throughout the United States...
Page 291 - In your hands, my dissatisfied fellowcountrymen, and not in mine, is the momentous issue of civil war. The government will not assail you. You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors. You have no oath registered in heaven to destroy . the government, while I shall have the most solemn one to "preserve, protect, and defend
Page 170 - Excessive partiality for one foreign nation and excessive dislike of another, cause those whom they actuate to see danger only on one side, and serve to veil and even second the arts of influence on the other. Real patriots, who may resist the intrigues of the favorite, are liable to become suspected and odious ; while its tools and dupes usurp the applause and confidence of the people, to surrender their interests.
Page 170 - The great rule of conduct for us, in regard to foreign Nations is, [in extending our commercial relations,] to have with them as little Political connection as possible.
Page 64 - States, and exacting such postage on the papers passing thro' the same as may be requisite to defray the expenses of the said office — appointing all officers of the land forces, in the service of the United States, excepting regimental officers — appointing all the officers of the naval forces, and commissioning all officers whatever in the service of the United States — making rules for the government and regulation of the said land and naval forces, and directing their operations. The United...
Page 57 - The said states hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other, for their common defence, the security of their Liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other, against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade, or any other pretence whatever.
Page 158 - But as it is easy to foresee that from different causes and from different quarters much pains will be taken, many artifices employed, to weaken in your minds the conviction of this truth, as this is the point in your political fortress against which the batteries of internal and external enemies will be most constantly and actively (though often covertly and insidiously) directed, it is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national union to your collective...

Bibliographic information