People and Nature: An Introduction to Human Ecological Relations

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John Wiley & Sons, Feb 4, 2009 - Social Science - 232 pages
This book provides a lively and thoughtful introduction to ecological anthropology by examining the evolving relations between human communities and nature.

  • Written by a noted anthropologist, geographer, and environmental scientist.
  • Reviews the evolution of human interactions with the natural world---drawing from anthropology and geography.
  • Explores those aspects of human ecological relations that seem to account for the greater connectedness of certain societies to their physical environment.
  • Offers a vision for improved relations between humans and nature.
 

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Contents

1 Human Agency and the State of the Earth
1
Can one Conceive of Ecosystems Without Human Agents?
9
Individuals Making a Difference
13
Overwhelming Evidence for Concern with the Condition of the Earth System
16
Looking Back and Looking Forward
23
How Things Were
26
The Rise of CrossDisciplinary TeamBased Approaches
32
The Evolution of HumanEnvironment Interactions
39
Making Better Decisions
103
Population and the Environment
106
6 Rebuilding Communities and Institutions
116
What is Sacred in Human Evolution?
118
Tragedies of the Commons
121
Institutions and SelfOrganization
125
Bioregionalism Deep Ecology and Embedding People In Nature
129
7 Can We Learn When We Have Enough?
131

Setting our Preferences
44
How Did We Decide To Become Farmers?
48
An Uneasy Relationship
51
More Food for The Masses
53
3 The Great Forgetting
57
The Archaeology of Environmental Change
65
The UrbanIndustrial Revolution and the Unleashing of Prometheus
68
Humandominated ecosystems
71
Are We In It?
74
Ecosystem Productivity and Net Primary Production
80
Land Use and Long Term Disturbance
83
5 What Makes People Do That?
93
Mitigation and the Cautionary Principle
102
Patterns of Consumption in Developed Countries
132
Patterns of Consumption in Developing Countries
138
A Feeding Frenzy and a Crisis in Public Health
142
Burning Fossil Fuels instead of Calories
145
Do We Have Enough Material Goods Now?
147
When Less Is More
150
When Less Is More
158
The Scale of the Problem and the Scale of the Solution
166
Valuing Community and Trust Rather Than More Stuff
170
Are We Happier When We Have More?
175
References
178
Index
206
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About the author (2009)

Emilio F. Moran is Rudy Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University and also Professor of Environmental Sciences, Adjunct Professor of Geography, and Director of the Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change.

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