Ambrose the sculptor, Volume 2

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Smith, Elder, & Company, 1854
 

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Page 280 - The author of these various manuals of the social sciences has the art of stating clearly the abstruse points of political economy and metaphysics, and making them level to every understanding.
Page 52 - So as there is as much difference between the counsel that a friend giveth, and that a man giveth himself, as there is between the counsel of a friend and of a flatterer; for there is no such flatterer as is a man's self, and there is no such remedy against flattery of a man's self as the liberty of a friend.
Page 280 - Universally and cordially do we recommend this delightful volume. We believe no person could read this work and not be the better for its pious and touching lessons.
Page 273 - ... To those who attended the lectures, the book will be a pleasant reminiscence, to others an exciting novelty. The style — clear, idiomatic, forcible, familiar, but never slovenly ; the searching strokes of sarcasm or irony ; the occasional flashes of generous scorn ; the touches of pathos, pity, and tenderness , the morality tempered but never weakened by experience and sympathy ; the felicitous phrases, the striking anecdotes, the passages of wise, practical reflection ; all these lose much...
Page 52 - And certain it is, that the light that a man receiveth by counsel from another is drier and purer than that which cometh from his own understanding and judgment, which is ever infused and drenched in his affections and customs.
Page 280 - THE BHILSA TOPES ; OR, BUDDHIST MONUMENTS OF CENTRAL INDIA. By Major CUNNINGHAM. One vol., 8vo, with Thirty-three Plates, price 30s. cloth.
Page 277 - Miss Kavanagh has undertaken a delicate task, and she has performed it on the whole with discretion and judgment. Her volumes may lie on any drawing-room table without scandal, and may be read by all but her youngest countrywomen without risk.
Page 272 - ... work will send the painter more than ever to the study of nature ; will train men who have always been delighted spectators of nature, to be also attentive observers. Our critics will learn to admire, and mere admirers will learn how to criticise : thus a public will be educated." — BlackwoocFs Magazine. " A generous and impassioned review of the works of living painters. A hearty and earnest work, full of deep thought, and developing great and striking truths in art.
Page 275 - Tatler and Spectator days, and is very fitly associated with that time of good English literature by its manly feeling, direct, unaffected manner of writing, and nicely-managed, well-turned narrative. The descriptions are excellent ; some of the country painting is as fresh as a landscape by Constable, or an idyl by Alfred Tennyson.
Page 271 - This book is one which, perhaps, no other man could have written, and one for which the world ought to be and will be thankful. It is in the highest degree eloquent, acute, stimulating to thought, and fertile in suggestion. It...

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