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2. Righteousness also; that is, the author of the righteousness of faith. For it is on his account, that God counts men's faith for sighteousness.

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3. And sanctification : Not an external and relative, but a real internal sanctification. See Ephef. iv. 24.

4. And redemption ; namely, from death the punishment of sin, by a glorious resurrection. This is called, The redemption of our body, Rom. viii. 23.

- CHAP. CHAP. II.

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View and Illustration of the Reasonings in this Chapter. DECAUSE the learned Greeks had objected to the gospel,

D the foolishness (as they were pleased to call it) of its doctrines, and the weakness of its preachers, the apostle made answer in the foregoing chapter, 'that by these foolish doctrines and weak preachers, a reformation had been wrought in the minds and manners of multitudes, which the boasted philosophy of the Greeks, and the eloquence of their orators, had not been able to accomplish. But this being a matter of great importance, and the faction having upbraided Paul in particular, with his want of eloquence, he now proceeded in this chapter, to tell the Corinthians, that Christ having sent him to preach, not with the wisdom of speech, (See chap. i. 17.) he acted agreeably to his commission, when he came to them, not with the excellency of Speech, or of wisdom, declaring the testimony of God, ver. 1.By thus disclaiming the Grecian philosophy and rhetoric, and by calling the gospel the testimony of God, the apostle insinuated, that the credibility of the gospel depended neither on its conformity to the philosophy of the Greeks, nor on the eloquence of its preachers, but on the attestation of God, who confirmed it by miracles.--And therefore, however ridiculous it might appear in their eyes, he determined to make known nothing among the Corinthians, either in his private conversations, or in his public discourses, but Jesus Christ, and bim crucified for the fins of men, ver. 2. At the same time, knowing the opinion which the learned Greeks would form of that doctrine in particular, as well as that his discourses were neither composed nor pronounced according to the rules of the Grecian rhetoric, his first addresses to them were in weakness, and in fear, and with much trembling, ver. 3.-Yet they were accompanied with the powerful demonstration of the Spirit, who enabled him to prove the things which he preached, by miracles, ver. 4.--that the faith of mankind might be founded, not in the wisdom of men, that method of reasoning and speaking, which human wisdom dictates 28 best calculated to persuade, but in the power of God, ver. 5.

However, left the things which are said in the preceding chapter, concerning the foolishness of the doctrines of the gospel, and in this chapter concerning its having no relation to any of the schemes of the Greek philosophy, might have led the Corinthians to think meanly of it; the apostle told them, that in the gospel, he and his brethren made known a scheme of doc

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Spirit of God, is able to examine and receive the things revealed by the Spirit. Yet he himself is examined and judged by no animal man: because no animal man can understand the principles upon which the spiritual man's belief is founded, ver. 15. -For what animal man hath understood and approved the gra

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could endure no scheme of doctrine that was not conformable to their philofophy: and valued their teachers in proportion to the skill which

they

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