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THE CAMBRIAN;

A NATIONAL MONTHLY MAGAZINE,

PUBLISHED IN TBE INTERESTS OF

The Welsh-American People and their Children,

DEVOTED TO

History, Biography, Literature,

RELIGION, SCIENCE,

AND

General Celtic Intelligence.

EDITED BY

REV. E. C. EVANS, REMSEN, N. Y.

VOLUME XIV.

UTICA, N. Y.
T. J. GRIFFITHS, PRINTER, EXCHANGE BUILDINGS.

1894

PREFACE.

TO THE FRIENDS AND READERS OF THE CAMBRIAN :
Another

year has run its course, and with it another volume of The Cam. BRIAN is completed, which, in view of the hard times experienced by every industry, trade and business in the country, is a matter for congratulation: The fourteen volumes already published, unsupported by any special society or denomination, and relying only on its merits and mission, speaks highly of the favor accorded to THE CAMBRIAN from the beginning by its friends and subscribers. For this favor we are specially thankful, and we would earnestly ask its continuance for the coming year.

Although the depressed condition of the country affects the financial status of newspapers and periodicals, yet we venture to offer valuable premiums, on liberal terms, to new and old subscribers, and (in addition) to the features which already distinguish THE CAMBRIAN, we shall, during the coming year, introduce some new features which will greatly add to its value and usefulnese, and make it more acceptable and interesting to its readers.

The past year will be memorable for its chaotic unrest and disorder. It has been marked by war and rumors of war among nations ; strikes, stagnation and hardship in trade and business ; change, decay and corruption in politics ; great events and potential personalities appearing in rapid succession on the stage of history; suggesting both the clouds and darkness which mark God's mysterious dispensations, and also the righteousness and judgment which are the foundation of His throne. Already there are signs of a good time coming,—the dawn of a new era,-a new heaven and a new earth wherein dwelleth righteousness.

The past year in Wales has been distinguished by the establishment at last of a Welsh National University, consisting of the three University Colleges of Bangor, Aberystwyth and Cardiff, and a course in theology provided by the various denominational colleges. In connection with the usual restless agitation for reforms, the Welsh Land Commission, the organization of Parish Councils and of Cymru Fydd Societies and the disestablishment of the English Church in Wales, have been the chief questions of the day.

The Welsh people in this country, notwithstanding the general depression and a bad agricultural season, have been fairly prosperous, or at least, have not suffered so severely as other people in general. It is evident that fewer Welsh immigrants arrive in this country from year to year, the English

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