The History of England from the Invasion of Julius Csar to the Revolution in 1688, Volume 4

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Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1848 - Great Britain
 

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Page 182 - ... ever filled a throne: a conduct less rigorous, less imperious, more sincere, more indulgent to her people, would have been requisite to form a perfect character. By the force of her mind, she controlled all her more active and stronger qualities, and prevented them from running into excess.
Page 520 - My loving people, we have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit ourselves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery. But I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people. Let tyrants fear.
Page 541 - ... by some of the said commissioners, put to death, when and where, if by the laws and statutes of the land they had deserved death, by the same laws and statutes also they might, and by no other ought, to have been judged and executed.
Page 536 - That the Liberties, Franchises, Privileges, and Jurisdictions of Parliament. are the ancient and undoubted Birth-right and Inheritance of the Subjects of England ; and that the arduous and urgent Affairs concerning the King, State, and Defence of the Realm, and of the Church of England : and the Maintenance and Making of Laws, and Redress of Mischiefs and Grievances which daily happen within this Realm, are proper Subjects and Matter of Counsel and Debate in Parliament...
Page 536 - ... that the Commons in Parliament have like liberty and freedom to treat of these matters in such order as in their judgments shall seem fittest; and that every member of the said House hath like freedom from all impeachment, imprisonment, and molestation ( other than by censure of the House itself...
Page 181 - There are few great personages in history who have been more exposed to the calumny of enemies and the adulation of friends than Queen Elizabeth; and yet there scarcely is any whose reputation has been more certainly determined by the unanimous consent of posterity. The unusual length of her administration, and the strong features of her character, were able to overcome all prejudices; and obliging her detractors...
Page 541 - England," it is declared and enacted, That no freeman may be taken or imprisoned, or be disseised of his freehold or liberties, or his free customs, or be outlawed or exiled, or in any manner destroyed, but by the lawful judgment of his peers, or by the law of the land : IV.
Page 454 - ... up to that part of the table where the bread and wine lay, he bowed seven times. After the reading of many prayers, he approached the sacramental elements, and gently lifted up the corner of the napkin in which the bread was placed. When he beheld the bread, he suddenly let fall the napkin, flew back a step or two, bowed three several times towards the bread ; then he drew nigh again, opened -the napkin, and bowed as before.
Page 529 - Point forth six of the best given gentlemen of this court, and all they together show not so much good will, spend not so much time, bestow not so many hours daily, orderly, and constantly, for the increase of learning and knowledge, as doth the Queen's Majesty herself.
Page 540 - I., it is declared and enacted, that, from thenceforth, no person shall be compelled to make any loans to the king against his will, because such loans were against reason and the franchise of the land : and, by other laws of this realm it is provided, that none should be charged by any charge or imposition called a benevolence...

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