Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation

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Profile Books, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 209 pages
"In Eats, Shoots & Leaves, Lynne Truss dares to say that, with our system of punctuation patently endangered, it is time to look at our commas and semicolons and see them for the wonderful and necessary things they are. If there are only pedants left who care, then so be it. "Sticklers unite" is her rallying cry. "You have nothing to lose but your sense of proportion - and arguably you didn't have much of that to begin with."" "This is a book for people who love punctuation and get upset about it. From the invention of the question mark in the time of Charlemagne to Sir Roger Casement "hanged on a comma"; from George Orwell shunning the semicolon to Peter Cook saying Nevile Shute's three dots made him feel "all funny", this book makes a powerful case for the preservation of a system of printing conventions that is much too subtle to be mucked about with."--BOOK JACKET.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - streamsong - LibraryThing

This disc is comprised of four of the original British radio episodes from which became the basis of the book, Eats Shoots and Leaves. The episodes are humorous and entertaining and address such ... Read full review

Review: Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation

User Review  - Rosanne - Books Are Better Than Pants - Goodreads

3,5 stars Funny book about a woman who wants to start a grammar revolution. Because we suck at it; myself included. Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Lynne Truss was born on May 31, 1955, in Kingston upon Thames, England. She is an English writer and journalist. Her book Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation was a best-seller in 2003. Truss received a first-class honors degree in English Language and Literature from University College London in 1977. After graduation, she worked for the Radio Times as a sub-editor before moving to the Times Higher Education Supplement as the deputy literary editor in 1978. From 1986 to 1990, she was the literary editor of The Listener and was an arts and books reviewer for The Independent on Sunday before joining The Times in 1991. She currently reviews books for The Sunday Times. She has also written numerous books including Tennyson's Gift; Going Loco; Eats, Shoots and Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation; and Talk to the Hand: The Utter Bloody Rudeness of the World Today, or Six Good Reasons to Stay Home and Bolt the Door.

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