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" There is no question but the universe has certain bounds set to it : but when we consider that it is the work of infinite power, prompted by infinite goodness, with an infinite space... "
The British essayists; with prefaces by A. Chalmers - Page 243
by British essayists - 1802
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The Spectator, Volume 8

1729
...upon my felf with fecret Horrour, as a Being that was not worth the ftnalleft Regard of one who had fo great a Work under his Care and Superintendency. I was afraid of being overlooked arnidft the Immenfky of Nature, and loft among that infinite Variety of Creatures, which in all Probability...
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The Works of the Right Honourable Joseph Addison, Volume 3

Joseph Addison - 1804
...space to exert itself in^ ow can our imagination set any bounds to it ? . . ,,ii, To return therefpre to my first thought, I could not but look upon myself with a secret horror, as a being that was not worth the smallest regard of one who had so great a work undei:...
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The British Essayists, Volume 14

Alexander Chalmers - English essays - 1808
...goodness, with an infinite space to exert itself in, how can our imagination set any bounds to it ? To return therefore to my first thought. I could not...of one who had so great a work under his care and superintendent,}'. I was afraid of being overlooked amidst the immensity of nature, and lost among...
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The Spectator in miniature: being a collection of the principle ..., Volume 1

Spectator The - 1808
...upon myself with secret horror, as a heiag that was not worth the smallest regard of one who hid «o great a work under his care and superintendency. I was afraid of heing overlooked amidst the immensity of nature, and lust among that infinite variety of creatures,...
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The Spectator, Volume 14

Alexander Chalmers - 1810
...goodness, with an infinite space to exert itself in, how can our imagination set any bounds to it ?. To return therefore to my first thought. I could:...as a being that was not worth the smallest regard o£ one who had so great a work under his care and superintendency. I was afraid of being overlooked...
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The Works of the Right Honourable Joseph Addison, a New Ed., with ..., Volume 5

Joseph Addison, Richard Hurd - 1811
...goodness, with an infinite space to exert itself in, how can our imagination set any bounds to it? To return, therefore, to my first thought, I could...and lost among that infinite variety of creatures^ * This thought — I would say — this speculation — See the next note. b That he does not think...
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The Works of the Right Honourable Joseph Addison, Volume 5

Joseph Addison - 1811
...goodness, with an infinite space to exert itself in, how can our imagination set any bounds to it? To return, therefore, to my first thought, I could...and lost among that infinite variety of creatures ' This thought — I would say — this speculation — See the'next note. b That he does not think...
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The Spanish language, la gramática inglesa, and the English reader

Nicolas Gouin Dufief - Commercial correspondence, Spanish - 1811
...523 To return, therefore, to my first thought, I could not but look upon myself with secret horror.as a being that was not worth the smallest regard of one who had so great a work under liis care and superintendency. I was afraid of being overlooked amidst the immensity of nature, and...
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Elegant extracts: a copious selection of passages from the most ..., Volume 1

Elegant extracts - 1812
...goodness, with an infinite space to exert it self in, how can our imagination set any bounds to it? To return, therefore, to my first thought, I could...among that infinite variety of creatures, which in all prohability swarm through all these immeasurable regions of matter. In order to recover myself from...
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The English Reader: Or Pieces in Prose and Poetry Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - Readers - 1812 - 356 pages
...how can our imagination set any bounds to it ? To return, therefore, to my first thought, I could net but look upon myself with secret horror, as a being that was not worth the smallest regard ot one who haci so great a work under his care and superintendence. I was afraid of being overlooked...
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