Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Volumes 31-33

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Royal Society of London, 1723 - Meteorology
 

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Page 249 - When a ray of light passes from one medium to another, it is refracted so that the ratio of the sine of the angle of incidence to the sine of the angle of refraction is equal to the ratio of the velocities in the two media.
Page 108 - ... as the Poets describe the Old Chaos ; for such a Choc impelling the solid Parts would occasion the Waters, and all fluid Substances that were unconfined, as the Sea is, with one Impetus to run violently towards that Part of the Globe were [sic] the Blow was received ; and that with Force sufficient to rake with it the whole Bottom of the Ocean, and to carry it upon the Land ; heaping up into Mountains those earthy Parts it had born away with it, in those Places where the opposite Waves balance...
Page 440 - ... was placed on a silver point or needle, which, by means of screws adapted for that purpose, might be turned about, raised or depressed at pleasure, and thus be brought...
Page 173 - Guana . . ." 18 From Rogers's notes, Halley compiled tables which, he felt, clearly demonstrated the truth of his earlier hypothesis. He was not yet, however, satisfied. "It were to be wisht," he announced, that the French, who have had frequent Opportunities to do it, would bestow upon us an account of the Variations they have lately found in their Voyages from Peru and Chili to China.; and that the Spaniards would tell us how the Needle varies at this time in the North Part of that great Sea, through...
Page 84 - ... which the divisions were cut, lie in the same plane with the needle, and at such a distance from each other that the needle might play freely between them. A few of the degrees at the north end were divided into six equal parts, each division being 10'. It was easy, by the help of a convex glass, to determine the pointing of the needle to less than a quarter of these divisions, or to about 2
Page 178 - L'Aigle; and a few days after, the Dutch ship, with her cargo of brandy and oil, arose on the shore near Tangier, which is at least four leagues to the westward of the place where she sunk, and directly against the strength of the current, which has persuaded many men that there is a recurrency in the deep water in the middle of the Gut that sets outward to the grand ocean, which this accident very much demonstrates...
Page 150 - ... as were brought in Hives from England near a hundred Years ago, and not the natural produce of this part of America; for the first Planters of New England never observed a Bee in the Woods, until many Years after the Country was settled; but that which proves it beyond question is, that the Aborigines (the Indians) have no word in their Language for a Bee, as they have for all Animals whatsoever proper to, or aboriginally of the Country, and therefore for many Years called a Bee by the name of...
Page 309 - ... sensorium of God, space, time, vacuum, atoms, the perfection of the world, supramundane intelligence, and mathematical problems, is mentioned in the second edition of the Commercium Epistolicum. And what he hath been doing in Italy may be understood by the disputes raised there by one of his friends...
Page 166 - ... branches to each horn, and generally fpread about fix feet ; when the horns come out of the head they are round, like the horns of an ox, about a foot from the head they begin to grow a palm broad, and further up ftill wider, of which the Indians make good ladles, that will hold a pint. When a moofe goes through a thicket, or under the boughs of trees, he lays his horns back on his neck, not only that he may make his way the eafier, but to cover the body from the browfe or fcratch of the woods.
Page 437 - Begister of the same, in his own Hand- Writing, as being desirous the Gentlemen of the Society should, without Trouble, be enabled to examine many of those Objects, on which he had made the most considerable Discoveries. Several of these Objects yet remain before the Microscopes, tho' the greater Number are broken off, which was probably done by the shaking of the Boxes in the Carriage.

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