The Fall and Sin: What We Have Become as Sinners

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2004 - Religion - 280 pages
The devastating evils of recent history have brought about renewed interest in the Christian doctrine of sin. This volume explores with fresh insight and great seriousness the contemporary plausibility, meaning, and relevance of the biblical understanding of the Fall and its effects.

Marguerite Shuster argues that certain aspects of the traditional doctrine of the Fall, including the belief that it took place in time and space, cannot simply be set aside without serious consequences for our doctrine of God and our understanding of human identity, dignity, and responsibility. She explores the nature and extent of sin and examines such problematic issues as "degrees" of sin and culpability. Despite the seriousness with which Shuster treats these topics, her discussion is not despairing but instead points to the redemption that God has accomplished in Christ.

Filled with contemporary allusions and completed with model sermons on the Fall and sin, this volume is one of the best available studies of this key Christian doctrine.

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Contents

The Root of the Fall
37
The Nature of the Fall
49
Consequences of the Fall
62
The Divine Purpose and Moral Evil
84
THE DOCTRINE OF
97
Sin and Sins
135
Original Sin
159
Problems of Freedom
182
Civil Righteousness
212
Physical Death as Existential Reality
230
Death Shaping Life
238
Death the Funeral and the Grave
252
Biblical Vocabulary Relating to Sin
263
Name Index
271
Copyright

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Page 173 - ... their throat is an open sepulchre ; with their tongues they have used deceit ; the poison of asps is under their lips ; whose mouth is full of cursing and bitterness ; their feet are swift to shed blood, destruction and misery are in their ways, and the way of peace have they not known ; there is no fear of God before their eyes.
Page 262 - Death, be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so; For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me. From rest and sleep, which but thy...
Page 167 - I thank your Ladyship for the information concerning the Methodist preachers; their doctrines are most repulsive, and strongly tinctured with impertinence and disrespect towards their superiors, in perpetually endeavouring to level all ranks, and do away with all distinctions. It is monstrous to be told, that you have a heart as sinful as the common wretches that crawl on the earth. This is highly offensive and insulting; and I cannot but wonder that your Ladyship should relish any sentiments so...
Page 30 - You will not die. For God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil." So when the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was a delight to the eyes, and that the tree was to be desired to make one wise, she took of its fruit and ate; and she also gave some to her husband, and he ate.
Page 30 - You shall not eat from any tree in the garden'?" The woman said to the serpent, "We may eat of the fruit of the trees in the garden; but God said, 'You shall not eat of the fruit of the tree that is in the middle of the garden, nor shall you touch it, or you shall die.
Page 39 - Lady. Fool, do not boast ; Thou canst not touch the freedom of my mind 'With all thy charms, although this corporal rind Thou hast immanacled, while Heaven sees good.
Page 111 - God alone is Lord of the conscience, and hath left it free from the doctrines and commandments of men which are in any thing contrary to his word, or beside it, in matters of faith or worship.
Page 88 - ... hidden lord and master, and cruel, remorseless emperor commands me; that against all natural lovings and longings, I so keep pushing, and crowding, and jamming myself on all the time recklessly making me ready to do what in my own proper, natural heart, I durst not so much as dare? Is Ahab, Ahab? Is it I, God, or who, that lifts this arm?

About the author (2004)

Marguerite Shuster is professor of preaching at Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California.

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