The Bad Citizen in Classical Athens

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Oct 2, 2006 - History - 250 pages
This book provides a fresh perspective on Athenian democracy by exploring bad citizenship, both as a reality and an idea, in classical Athens, from the late sixth century down to 322. If called upon, Athenian citizens were expected to support their city through military service and financial outlay. These obligations were fundamental to Athenian understandings of citizenship and it was essential to the city's well-being that citizens fulfill them. The ancient sources, however, are full of allegations that individuals have avoided these duties or performed them deficiently. Claims of draft evasion, cowardice on the battlefield, and avoidance of liturgies and the war tax are common. By examining the nature and scope of bad citizenship in Athens and the city's responses-institutional and ideological-to the phenomenon, this study aims to illuminate the relationship between citizen and city under the Athenian democracy, and more broadly, the tension between private interests and public authority in human societies.
 

Contents

Section 1
27
Section 2
36
Section 3
45
Section 4
46
Section 5
47
Section 6
65
Section 7
80
Section 8
85
Section 15
116
Section 16
128
Section 17
133
Section 18
141
Section 19
143
Section 20
151
Section 21
155
Section 22
156

Section 9
88
Section 10
93
Section 11
108
Section 12
112
Section 13
114
Section 14
115
Section 23
170
Section 24
172
Section 25
176
Section 26
191
Section 27
203

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About the author (2006)

Matthew R. Christ is Professor of Classical Studies at Indiana University. He is the author of The Litigious Athenian.

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