Poetry and Music in Medieval France: From Jean Renart to Guillaume de Machaut

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Cambridge University Press, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 375 pages
In Poetry and Music in Medieval France, first published in 2003, Ardis Butterfield examines vernacular song in medieval France. She begins with the moment when French song first survives in writing in the early thirteenth century, and examines a large corpus of works which combine elements of narrative and song, as well as a range of genres which cross between different musical and literary categories. Emphasising the cosmopolitan artistic milieu of Arras, Butterfield describes the wide range of contexts in which secular songs were quoted and copied, including narrative romances, satires and love poems. She uses manuscript evidence to shed light on medieval perceptions of how music and poetry were composed and interpreted. The volume is well illustrated to demonstrate the rich visual culture of medieval French writing and music. This interdisciplinary study will be of interest to both literary and musical scholars of late medieval culture.
 

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Contents

Prologue
1
Song and written record in the early thirteenth century
13
chansonniers narratives dancesong
25
The performance of song in Jean Renarts Rose
64
The refrain
75
a case study
87
from secular to sacred in Gautier de Coinci
103
Courtly and popular in the thirteenth century
125
Lyric and narrative
206
Machaut and the thirteenth century
217
chanson motet salut and dit
224
I5 Citation and authorship from the thirteenth to
243
from Adam de la Halle
273
Epilogue
291
Appendix
303
Notes
313

Arras and the puys
133
the evidence of the manuscripts
171
Le Roman de Fauvel
200

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About the author (2002)

Ardis Butterfield is a Lecturer in English at University College, London. She has published widely on French and English literary and musical history. Her articles have appeared in Medium Aevum and Plainsong and Medieval Music.

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