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4 484 v.57 1853

LONDON:
SAVILL AND EDWARDS, PRINTERS, CHANDOS STREET,

COVENT GARDEN.

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ON THE LIFE AND WRITINGS OF HENRY FIELDING. BY THOMAS KEIGHTLEY. IN TWO PARTS.- PART TIE FIRST

1 LADY STRATHMORE'S DAUGHTER. BY THE AUTHOR OF MEG OF ELIBANK.' CIIAPTER 1.-JANET AT ROUEN

14 CHAPTER II.-THE DBAX

16 CHAPTER III.-THE VOYAGE

22 CHAPTER IV. -THE TOLBOOTI-WYND

25 CHAPTER V.-TIE SOLDIER OF BUNKER'S HILL............

28 A VISIT TO THE CHATEAUX OF RUBENS AND TENIERS................ 32 TABLE-TALK ON SHAKSPEARE. 'Love's Labour's Lost'....

40 WOODPECKERS..............

46 GOETHE’S HELENA. TRANSLATED BY THEODORE MARTIN .....

63 THE PHYSICIAN'S ART: DR. WATSON.........

94 NORTHERN LIGHTS. CITY POEMS AND CITY SERMONS. BY SHIRLEY 105 LIVINGSTONE'S TRAVELS IN SOUTH AFRICA......

118 ' A MAD WORLD, MY MASTERS. BY A SANITARY REFORMER .....

............. 133

LONDON:
JOHN W. PARKER AND SON, WEST STRAND.

IDCCCLVIII.

FRASER'S MAGAZINE FOR DECEMBER, 1857,

CONTAINS,

WATERTON'S ESSAYS ON NATURAL HISTORY.-THIRD SERIES.

THE STORY OF AN EDINBURGH CHURCH.

RECENT METAPHYSICAL WORKS-LEWES, MAURICE, FLEMING.

ANTIQUITIES OF THE JUMNAH.

THE INTERPRETER; A TALE OF THE WAR. PART XII.- CONCLUSION. BY

G. J. WHYTE MELVILLE, AUTIOR OP 'DIGBY GRAND,' ETC.

MEMORIALS AND CORRESPONDENCE OF CHARLES JAMES FOX.

ON THE USE OF PROVERBS IN GRAVE COMPOSITION.
THE ‘ENGLISHMAN'S-HOUSE-HIS-CASTLE' THEORY; Or, A GLANCE

AT TIE POLICE OP TIE STREETS. BY A GRUMBLER.

LORD NORMANBY AND A YEAR OF REVOLUTION.

TRANSLATIONS FROM THE ITALIAN.

A SUMMER VISION.

INDIA IN MOURNING.

INDEX.

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. The Eililor of Fraser's MAGAZINE does not undertako to return poper's that are sent to him for consideration.

FRASER'S MAGAZINE.

JANUARY, 1858.

ON THE LIFE AND WRITINGS OF HENRY FIELDING.

BY THOMAS KEIGHTLEY.

IN Two Parts.-PART THE FIRST. IN.former days the following brief With some few exceptions, those

biographic notices would perhaps genealogies which run far back into have been termed an Apology ; for the middle ages are of a mythic my object is to vindicate the cha- character; doubts respecting their racter of Henry Fielding, who in my accuracy will arise in the mind opinion has met with rather hard of a cautious inquirer, and the measure from friends as well as from creative art of the herald be susfoes. I even take under my patronage pected. Perhaps this may be the his two principal heroes, and hope character of that of the noble house to be able to show that they, too, of Denbigh, though there is cerhave met with treatment which they tainly no violent improbability in did not altogether deserve. I have the tradition of its founder having been ied to it by a perusal of Mr. been a knight of the future Imperial Lawrence's late work on this sub- House of Hapsburg, who, having ject, which not a little disappointed lost his possessions in bis native me, as I believe it did almost Germany, sought fortune in Engevery one else. This is much to land in the time of Henry III. Be be regretted, as Mr. Lawrence has this, however, as it may, the true shown extreme and most laudable glory of this house is not its imperial diligence in the collection of mate- kindred, but its counting among its rials, but unfortunately the artistic members him of whom I write, skill to combine and put them to whose name seems destined to live advantage was wanting; for Mr. as long as Shakspeare's—that is, as Lawrence does not possess the bio- long as the English language itself. graphic talent-a talent which lies To proceed, howerer : by marriage between those of the historian and with sundry English heiresses, the the novelist, and secms in its per family gradually acquired wealth fection to be as rare as either of and lands; and in 1622, Sir William them. Accordingly he fails to was created Earl of Denbigh, and make the due use of his materials ; about two months later, his second he does not always see what was, as son, George, Viscount Callan, in it were, before his eyes, he fails to Ireland, with succession to the earl. draw inferences, or draws erroneous dom of Desmond. This earl's eldest ones. Add to this a habit of relating son afterwards became Earl of Den. circumstances, occasionally of im- bigh on failure of the male line in portance, without referring to any the elder branch. All these particuauthority. My object, then, is to do lars, I need hardly say, will be found what he has left undone ; from his in Sir Bernard Burke's Peerage. materials and references to make The name of the family is said to correct statements, and deduce just, be derived from a district named or at least probable, conclusions, Rhein- filding, belonging to the and if possible to represent Henry counts of Hapsburg; and it is Fielding as he really was. I have curious enough that the sons of the given these remarks somewhat of the first earl spelt it differently—the biographic form to keep up a certain peer spelling it Feilding; his brodegree of interest, and I will quote ther, Henry's grandfather, Fielding. at length the statements of others, There is a story, related as usual by and then examine them critically:

Mr. Lawrence without giving any As Fielding was of a noble family, authority, that Lord Denbigh one it seems necessary to say a few words day asked Henry how it was that, respecting his pedigree.

being of the one family, they spelt

VOL. LVII. NO, CCCXXXVII.

A

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