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THE Lord let the house of a brute to the

soul of a man, And the man said, • Am I your debtor ?' And the Lord — Not yet; but make it as

clean as you can, And then I will let you a better.'

I

I

What be those crown'd forms high over

the sacred fountain ? Bards, that the mighty Muses have raised

to the heights of the mountain, And over the flight of the Ages i O God

desses, help me up thither! Lightning may shrivel the laurel of Cæsar,

but mine would not wither. Steep is the mountain, but you, you will

help me to overcome it, And stand with my head in the zenith, and

roll my voice from the summit, Sounding for ever and ever thro' Earth

and her listening nations, And mixt with the great sphere-music of

stars and of constellations.

If my body come from brutes, my soul un

certain or a fable, Why not bask amid the senses while the

sun of morning shines, I, the finer brute rejoicing in my hounds,

and in my stable, Youth and health, and birth and wealth,

and choice of women and of wines ?

II

What hast thou done for me, grim Old

Age, save breaking my bones on the

rack ? Would I had past in the morning that

looks so bright from afar !

OLD AGE

II What be those two shapes high over the

sacred fountain, Taller than all the Muses, and huger than

all the mountain ? On those two known peaks they stand ever

spreading and heightening; Poet, that evergreen laurel is blasted by

more than lightning !

Done for thee? starved the wild beast that

was linkt with thee eighty years

back. Less weight now for the ladder-of-heaven

that hangs on a ster.

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Far, far, how far ? from o'er the gates of

birth, The faint horizons, all the bounds of earth,

Far – far — away ?

Act first, this Earth, a stage so glooin'd

You all but sicken at the shifting scenes. And yet be patient. Our Playwright may

show In some fifth act what this wild Drama

means.

Sing the new year in under the blue.
ON ONE WHO AFFECTED AN

Last year you sang it as gladly.
EFFEMINATE MANNER

New, new, new, new ľIs it then so nen
That
you

should carol so madly?
WHILE man and woman still are incom-
plete,

• Love again, song again, nest again, young I prize that soul where man and woman again,' meet,

Never a prophet so crazy! Which types all Nature's male and female And hardly a daisy as yet, little friend, plan,

See, there is hardly a daisy. But, friend, man - woman is not woman

• Here again, here, here, here, happy year

O warble unchidden, unbidden !

Summer is coming, is coming, my dear, TO ONE WHO RAN DOWN THE

And all the winters are hidden.
ENGLISH

man.

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All his leaves

Fallen at length,
Look, he stands,
Trunk and bough,

Naked strength.

IN MEMORIAM

W. G. WARD

This poem, which had been printed in this
country in the New York · World,' was first
published in England, 'to secure copyright, in
an edition ultimately reduced to two copies,
... a mere leaflet, consisting of a title and
one page of text' (Waugh). It was subse-
quently printed in the New Review' for Oc-
tober, 1889, and was included in the ‘ Demeter'
volume, published in December of the same
year.
• SUMMER is coming, summer is coming.

I know it, I know it, I know it.
Light again, leaf again, life again, love

again!'
Yes, my wild little Poet.

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ment in the Church of England, is the first to arrest the attention of the observer;' and, after discussing its influence on the religion of England, adds that its originators 'found theniselves stranded in an eddy of the stream they had set in motion, and while the Catholic revival vivified and transformed the English Church, itself being modified and transformed in the process, its distinguished pioneers, with Newman and Ward at their head, joined the Church of Rome.' The life of Ward, with special reference to his connection with this religious movement, has been written by his son, Mr. Wilfrid Ward, in the two volumes entitled • Williain George Ward and the Oxford Move. ment' (London, 1889), which was reviewed by

the present Lord Tennyson in the 'Nineteenth
Century, (vol. xxvi. p. 343), and “William
George Ward and the Catholic Revival in Eng.
land' (London, 1893).
FAREWELL, whose like on earth I shall not

find,
Whose Faith and Work were bells of

full accord,
My friend, the most unworldly of mankind,
Most generous of all Ultramontanes,

Ward,
How subtle at tierce and quart of mind

with mind,
How loyal in the following of thy Lord !

QUEEN MARY

A DRAMA

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This play, though the last in the chronological order of the historical trilogy' (* Harold, • Becket,' and Queen Mary'), was the first in the order of composition. It was published in 1875. The next year it was produced, with some necessary abridgment (it is much the longest of the three plays) at the Lyceum Theatre in London, Mr. Irving taking the part of Philip II.

*This trilogy of plays,' as the poet notes (“Memoir,' vol. ii. p. 173), portrays the making of England.' In. Harold' we have the great conflict between Danes, Saxons, and Normans for supremacy, the awakening of the English people and clergy from the slumber into which they had for the most part fallen, and the forecast of the greatness of our composite race. In Becket" the struggle is between the Crown and the Church for predominance, a struggle which continued for many centuries. In “Mary” are described the final downfall of Roman Catholicism in England, and the dawning of a new age ; for after the era of priestly domination comes the era of the freedom of the individual.' See also the ‘Memoir,' vol. ii. pp. 176-185.

DRAMATIS PERSONÆ
QUEEN MARY.
PHILIP, King of Naples and Sicily, afterwards King of Spain.
THE PRINCESS ELIZABETH.
REGINALD Pole, Cardinal and Papal Legate.
Simon RENARD, Spanish Ambassador.
LE SIEUR DE NOAILLES, French Ambassador.
THOMAS CRANMER, Archbishop of Canterbury,
Sir Nicholas HEATH, Archbishop of York; Lord Chancellor after Gardiner.
EDWARD COURTENAY, Earl of Devon.
LORD WILLIAM HOWARD, afterwards Lord Howard, and Lord High Admiral.
LORD WILLIAMS OF THAME.
LORD PAGET.
LORD PETRE.
STEPHEN GARDINER, Bishop of Winchester and Lord Chancellor.
EDMUND BONNER, Bishop of London.
Thomas THIRLBY, Bishop of Ely.
SIR THOMAS WYATT
SIR THOMAS STAFFORD

Insurrectionary Leaders.
IR RALPH BAGENHALL.
SIR ROBERT SOUTHWELL.
SIR HENRY BEDINGFIELD.
SIR WILLIAM CECIL.
SIR THOMAS White, Lord Mayor of London.
THE DUKE OF ALVA
THE COUNT DE FERIA
PETER MARTYR.
FATHER COLE.
FATHER BOURXR.

} attending on Philip.

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Lords and other Attendants, Members of the Privy Council, Members of Parliament, Two Gentlemer,

Aldermen, Citizens, Peasants, Ushers, Messengers, Guards, Pages, Gospellers, Marshalmen, etc.

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QUEEN MARY

Third Citizen. It 's Queen Mary.

Old Nokes. The blessed Mary 's a-passACT I

ing!

[Falls on his knees.

Nokes. Let father alone, my masters ! SCENE I.-ALDGATE RICHLY DECORATED he's past your questioning. CROWD. MARSHALMEN

Third Citizen. Answer thou for bim,

then ! thou 'rt no such cockerel thyself, for Marshalman. Stand back, keep a clear thou was boru i' the tail end of old Harry lane! When will her Majesty pass, say'st the Seventh. thou ? why now, even now; wherefore draw Nokes. Eh! that was afore bastard. back your heads and your horns before I making began. I was born true man at break them, and make what noise you will five in the forenoon, i' the tail of old Harry, with your tongues, so it be not treason. and so they can't make me a bastard. Long live Queen Mary, the lawful and le- Third Citizen. But if Parliament can gitimate daughter of Harry the Eighth ! | make the Queen a bastard, why, it follows Shout, knaves !

all the more that they can make thee one, Citizens. Long live Queen Mary !

who art fray'd i' the knees, and ont at First Citizen. That's a hard word, legi- elbow, and bald o' the back, and bursten timate; what does it mean ?

at the toes, and down at heels. Second Citizen. It means a bastard.

Nokes. I was born of a true man and a Third Citizen. Nay, it means true-born. ring'd wife, and I can't argue upon it; but

First Citizen. Why, did n't the Parlia- I and my old woman 'ud burn upon it, that ment make her a bastard ?

would we. Second Citizen. No; it was the Lady Marshalman. What are you cackling of Elizabeth.

bastardy under the Queen's own pose ? Third Citizen. That was after, man; I'll have you flogg'd and burnt too, by that was after.

the rood I will. First Citizen. Then which is the bas- First Citizen. He swears by the rood. tard ?

Whew ! Second Citizen. Troth, they be both bas- Second Citizen. Hark! the trumpets. tards by Act of Parliament and Council.

[The Procession passes, Mary and Third Citizen. Ay, the Parliament can Elizabeth riding side by side, and dismake every true-born man of us a bastard. appears under the gate. Old Nokes, can't it make thee a bastard ? Citizens. Long live Queen Mary! down thou shouldst know, for thou art as white with all traitors ! God save her Grace; and as three Christmases.

death to Northumberland ! [Ereunt. Old Nokes_(dreamily). Who's a-passing? King Edward or King Richard ?

Manent Two GENTLEMEN. Third Citizen. No, old Nokes.

First Gentleman. By God's light a noble Old Nokes. It's Harry !

creature, right royal

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