Verse in English from Eighteenth-century Ireland

Front Cover
Andrew Carpenter
Cork University Press, 1998 - Poetry - 623 pages
This pioneering anthology introduces many previously neglected eighteenth-century writers to a general readership, and will lead to a re-examination of the entire canon of Irish verse in English.







Between 1700 and 1800, Dublin was second only to London as a center for the printing of poetry in English. Many fine poets were active during this period. However, because Irish eighteenth-century verse in English has to a great extent escaped the scholar and the anthologist, it is hardly known at all.







The most innovative aspect of this new anthology is the inclusion of many poetic voices entirely unknown to modern readers. Although the anthology contains the work of well-known figures such as John Toland, Thomas Parnell, Jonathan Swift, Patrick Delany, Laetitia Pilkington and Oliver Goldsmith, there are many verses by lesser known writers and nearly eighty anonymous poems which come from the broadsheets, manuscripts and chapbooks of the time. What emerges is an entirely new perspective on life in eighteenth-century Ireland. We hear the voice of a hard working farmer's wife from county Derry, of a rambling weaver from county Antrim, and that of a woman dying from drink. We learn about whale-fishing in county Donegal, about farming in county Kerry and bull-baiting in Dublin. In fact, almost every aspect of life in eighteenth-century Ireland is described vividly, energetically, with humor and feeling in the verse of this anthology.







Among the most moving poems are those by Irish-speaking poets who use amhran or song meter and internal assonance, both borrowed from Irish, in their English verse. Equally interesting is the work of the weaver poets of Ulster who wrote in vigorous and energetic Ulster-Scots. The anthology also includes political poems dating from the reign of James II to the Act of Union, as well as a selection of lesser-known nationalist and Orange songs. Each poem is fully annotated and the book also contains a glossary of terms in Hiberno-English and Ulster Scots.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
James Orr 177017981816
6
Jonathan Swift
7
Chapbook verse of the 1780s
20
James Ward 169117181736
30
A Note on the Texts
34
Nahum Tate 165216981715
54
William King 166317041712
61
James Eyre Weekes c 17201743c 1754
296
Anonymous songs and poems from the 1750s
302
Thomas Mozeen fl 1750 d 1768
314
Samuel Whyte 173317581811
320
Liam Inglis 170917601778
327
Anonymous poems from the 1760s
338
Anonymous verse from newspapers and books of the 1780s
405
Anonymous IrishEnglish poems from the 1780s
420

William Congreve 167017101729
67
Mary Monck c 167817151715
75
Morrough OConnor fl 171940
83
Matthew Concanen 170117201749
90
Anonymous poems current 171025
99
Nicholas Browne c 169917221734
128
Mary Davys 167417251732
135
Swift and his Irish contemporaries 171345
143
Jonathan Swift 16671745
151
Thomas Sheridan 16871738
164
Jonathan Swift Patrick Delany Thomas Sheridan and others
182
Matthew Pilkington 170117311774
197
James Arbuckle c 17001745c 1747
231
Anonymous poems from the 1730s and 1740s
241
James Sterling 170117371763
253
Wetenhall Wilkes fl 1737 d 1751
260
John Earl of Orrery 170717411762
268
Laurence Whyte c 16831742c 1753
278
John Taylor fl 1787
428
Brian Merriman c 174917891805
446
Charlotte Brooke c 174017891793
453
OReilly fl 1790
459
Pat OKelly 17541791c 1812
468
Henrietta ONeill 175817921793
475
Samuel Thomson 176617931816
482
Edward Walsh 175617931832
490
Four anonymous rambling songs
498
Anonymous poems from the 1790s
507
Richard Alfred Milliken 176718001815
523
Jane Elizabeth Moore 17381796?
530
Mary Alcock c 174217981798
537
Hugh Porter 178017991812
552
Three Orange Songs
576
Edward Lysaght 176318001810
582
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