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ANNOUNCEMENT.

The publishers of the North AMERICAN Review beg to announce, in response to numerous inquiries, that the lamented death of Mr. Allen Thorndike Rice will cause no interruption in the publication of the Review. No effort will be spared to maintain for it the unrivalled position among the periodicals of the world which it won and occupied under Mr. Rice's guidance and control.

The lines projected by Mr. Rice will be in the main adhered to by the new management in so far that the Review will continue to be essentially

A MAGAZINE OF THE TIMES,

calling to its aid the leaders of original thought and action in every field of human progress.

Much has already been done to make the present volume one of the most notable ever issued, and the August, September and October numbers will contain important articles by

Gen. JOHN A. POPE, JEFFERSON DAVIS, Senor M, ROMERO (the Mexican Minis-
ter), FREDERIC HARRISON, ROBERT G. INGERSOLL, LORD WOLSELEY,
MARION HARLAND, Prof. U. S. SHALER, EDWARDS PIERREPONT,
AUSTIN CORBIN, LORD BRASSEY, ANDREW LANG, LYMAN
ABBOTT, Mrs. SCHUYLER VAN I:ENSSELAER, DION
BOUCIOAULT, Commander V. L CAMERON, R. N.,
MONA CAIRD, HENRY OLEWS, Archdeacon
FARRAR, the late E. P. WHIPPLE, and

many others.

Indeed nothing that can help to preserve the high character and extraordinary circulation of the Review will be left undone. Much, however, cannot be announced in advance, as it is the policy of the Review to deal promptly with questions of immediate interest, and space is reserved every month for the discussion of the subjects uppermost in the public mind.

Office of The North American Review,
3 East 14th Street, New York,

June 20, 1889.

Copyright, 1889, by CHARLES U. COTTING, Administrator. Entered at the Post-Office at New York, and admitted for transmission through the mails as second-class matter.

THE

NORTH AMERICAN

REVIEW.

RE-ESTABLISHED BY ALLEN THORNDIRE RICE.

EDITED BY LLOYD BRYCE.

VOL. CXLIX.

Tros Tyriusque mihi nullo discrimine agetur.

NEW YORK:

No. 3 EAST FOURTEENTH STREET.

1889.

OOPTRICHT BY
LLOYD BRYCE

1859.

NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW.

No. CCCXCII.

JULY, 1889.

DISCIPLINE IN AMERICAN COLLEGES.

BY PRESIDENT BARTLETT OF DARTMOUTH, PRESIDENT ANGELL

OF MICHIGAN, PROFESSOR SHALER OF HARVARD, PRESIDENT
ADAMS OF CORNELL, PRESIDENT HYDE OF BOW DOIN, PRINCIPAL
DAWSON OF M'GILL, AND PRESIDENT DAVIS OF CALIFORNIA.

How far should a university control its students ? The inquiry relates, of course, to the American, and not the European, university. The latter is quite a different institution from the former. The German university may be summarily characterized as a cluster of professional schools, preceded by the long (seven years) and rigid drill of the gymnasium. Oxford and Cambridge stand in a somewhat similar relation to such an elaborate training as is given at Winchester and Rugby. Of these universities it may be remarked in passing that they are sufficiently inflexible in the courses of study they prescribe and the amount of attendance they require for their degrees, and rigid in regard to some matters of conduct, though lax enough in others.

The American university is a very different affair. The name covers a variety of institutions, no one of which fully corresponds to the European one. Some of them have nothing of the foreign university character, but only the gymnasium or college elements, which, indeed, greatly predominate in our largest so-called universities, and are not wholly eliminated from Johns Hopkins, VOL. CXLIX.-20. 392.

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