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reading he tas-fold ni ili purpose 14. to niémask ste stilledüel formers 2= the acquisiliosa 3 Anonledze ar face 3* The acquisilin, I skill or the chilla to employ

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How to judge Books.-Would you know whether the tendency of a book is good or evil, ex. amine in what state of mind you lay it down. Hos it induced you to suspect that what you have been accustomed to think unlawful and dangerous, may, after all, be innocent and harmlegs! Has it tended to make you impatient under control, and disposro

you to relax in self-government? Has it addressed Itself to your pride, your vanity, your selfishness, or any other of your evil propensities ! Has it defiled the imagination or shocked the beart 1 Has it disturbed the sense of right and wrong which the Creator has implanted in the human soul? If soif you are conscious ef all or any of these effects or if, having escaped from all, you have felt that such' were the effects it was intended to produce, throw the book into the fire.Southen.

What to read.

Are you deficient *
Read the best English poets, such as Tapson,
Gray, Goldsruith, Pope, Cowper, Coleridge, Scott,
and Wordsworth.

Are you deficient in imagination Read Milton,
Akenside, Burke, and Shakespeare.

Are you deficient in powers of reasoning? Read Chillingworth, Bacon and Locke.

Ire you deficient in judgment and good sense in the common affairs of life | Rend Franklin.

Are you deficient in sensibility? Read Goothel and Mackenzie.

Are you deficient in political knowledge ?
Montesquieu, the Federalist, Webster anilc

Are you deficient in patriotism! Read
thenes and the Life of Washington.

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THE

STUDENT'S COMMON-PLACE BOOK:

10% 342
A CYCLOPEDIA OF ILLUSTRATION AND Fact,

TOPICALLY ARRANGED.

FOR THE USE OF STUDENTS IN EVERY DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LITERATURE.

INTERLEAVED FOR ADDITIONS.

VOLUME I.-ENGLISH LITERATURE.

With an Appendix, containing Hints on the Formation of a Student's Library, Etc., Etc.

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A. S. BARNES & COMPANY,
NEW YORK, CHICAGO, AND NEW ORLEANS.

1877

COPYRIGHT, 1876, BY HENRY J. FOX.

PREFACE.

"Next to the originator of a good sentence, is the first quoter of it."-Emerson.

“When found, make a note of.”—Captain Cuttle.

IN

N this volume the author gives the result of over thirty years of miscella

neous reading. It was his good fortune in young manhood, to purchase Todd's Index Rerum. It was found to be useful as a hint, but signally inadequate for the accomplishment of the purpose for which it was designed. A series of blotters and common-place books was adopted, and the accumulations at stated periods were analyzed and “posted-away" in the Index, after the manner of the merchant posting the aggregated items of his journal into his ledger day by day.

The greater part of the book is the result of actual and thorough reading. It is a record of notes taken with the book referred to in hand. In preparing it, however, for the press, the author has availed himself of published indexes to a limited extent. He would especially and gratefully acknowledge his indebtedness to Poole's Index to Periodical Literature, an invaluable work, now, unfortunately, out of print.

It is hardly possible to exaggerate the value of these regular literary accretions to the author, or to overestimate the value of the assistance they have been to him in all the duties connected with his professional life. What they have been to him he hopes they may prove to be to others.

The hive to which he has carried honey, some of it perchance discolored, is placed within the reach of all, so that they may not only eat its accumulated treasure, but add to its stores the more precious sweetness they themselves have gathered.

This volume is given to the public with the hope that it may prove to be a suggestion and a stimulus to all who contemplate entering any of the learned professions or who expect to earn their bread by labor in any of the now nu

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