The Making of a Hinterland: State, Society, and Economy in Inland North China, 1853-1937

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University of California Press, Aug 3, 1993 - History - 368 pages
This wholly original reassessment of critical issues in modern Chinese history traces social, economic, and ecological change in inland North China during the late Qing dynasty and the Republic. Using many new sources, Kenneth Pomeranz argues that the development of certain regions entailed the systematic underdevelopment of other regions. He maps changes in local finance, farming, transportation, taxation, and popular protest, and analyzes the consequences for different classes, sub-regions, and genders.

Pomeranz attributes these diverse developments to several causes: the growing but incomplete integration of North China into the world economy, the state's abandonment of many hinterland areas and traditional functions, and the effect of local social structures on these processes. He shows that hinterlands were made, not merely found, and were powerfully shaped by the strategies of local groups as well as outside forces.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Territory
4
The Time Frame
12
State Market and Integration in HuangYun
13
Political Economy and Chinese Development
18
A Theoretical Perspective
20
Local Interest Story Political Power and Regional Patterns in the Credit and Currency Markets
27
Shandongs Regional Credit Markets
32
Isolation Fuel Shortages and Deforestation
123
The Fuel Shortage and the Logic of SelfStrengthening
138
Reforestation and Its Dicountent
142
Ecology Transportation and Marginality
146
Sold Down the River?
153
The Central Governments Withdrawal
154
New Priorities New Austerity and Missed Opportunities
164
Social and Political Bases of Local Paralysis
168

The Durablity of Regional Economic Differences
36
Credit Markets and Other Regional Economic Bounaries
37
Regional Currency Markets
40
Local Public Finance
45
Supralocal Authorites and Political Selfprotection
47
Private Grain
50
The Powerful
52
The General Population
56
Fragmented Markets and Regional Economic Performance
59
Fragmented Markets and State Making
65
Community Coercion and Cotton
69
New Crop Varieties
72
Gleaning and Subsistence
82
Crop Watching and Cotton Societies
88
Regional Variation and Local Leadership
101
Permeability Openness and Socioeconomic Change
114
Ecological Crisis and the Logic of Selfstrengthening
120
The Cycle of Technical Backwardness
178
Yellow River Control in HuangYun
193
Redistributing the Flood Problem
201
Dealing with the Disaster
212
The Economic Costs of Hydraulic Decay
213
The Gentry and the Foreigners
222
The Warlord Years
235
The Formal Government Rural Bosses and Local Resistance
238
The Engineers and the Soldiers
253
HuangYun China and the World
267
List of Counties in Northwest and Southwest Shandong
285
Agricultural Losses from Hydraulic Decay
287
Extra Transport Costs Incurred Because of Hydraulic Decay in HuangYun
293
Bibliography
297
Index
321
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Kenneth Pomeranz is Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Irvine.

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