London and Its Celebrities: A Second Series of Literary and Historical Memorials of London, Volume 2

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Page 73 - Many were the wit-combats betwixt him and Ben Jonson, which two I behold like a Spanish great galleon, and an English man-of-war ; Master Jonson (like the former) was built far higher in learning ; solid, but slow in his performances.
Page 68 - For saddle-tree scarce reached had he His journey to begin, When, turning round his head, he saw Three customers come in. So down he came ; for loss of time, Although it grieved him sore, Yet loss of pence, full well he knew, Would trouble him much more.
Page 202 - I received one morning a message from poor Goldsmith that he was in great distress, and, as it was not in his power to come to me, begging that I would come to him as soon as possible. I sent him a guinea, and promised to come to him directly. I accordingly went as soon as I was...
Page 13 - And because the breath of flowers is far sweeter in the air (where it comes and goes like the warbling of music) than in the hand, therefore nothing is more fit for that delight, than to know what be the flowers and plants that do best perfume the air.
Page 72 - What things have we seen. Done at the Mermaid !' heard words that have been So nimble. and so full of subtile flame, As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest. And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life...
Page 176 - Come back into memory, like as thou wert in the dayspring of thy fancies, with hope like a fiery column before thee — the dark pillar not yet turned — Samuel Taylor Coleridge — Logician, Metaphysician, Bard ! — How have I seen the casual passer through the Cloisters stand still, entranced with admiration (while he weighed the disproportion between the speech and the garb of the young Mirandula) to hear thee unfold, in thy deep and sweet intonations, the mysteries of...
Page 286 - Full oft within the spacious walls, When he had fifty winters o'er him, My grave lord-keeper led the brawls ; The seal and maces danced before him. His bushy beard, and shoe-strings green, His high-crown'd hat, and satin doublet, Moved the stout heart of England's queen, Though Pope and Spaniard could not trouble it.
Page 375 - Art she had none, yet wanted none, For Nature did that want supply: So rich in treasures of her own, She might our boasted stores defy: Such noble vigour did her verse adorn That it seemed borrowed, where 'twas only born.
Page 455 - I did not think he ought to be shut up. His infirmities were not noxious to society. He insisted on people praying with him; and I'd as lief pray with Kit Smart as any one else. Another charge was, that he did not love clean linen ; and I have no passion for it.
Page 5 - My lord of Ely, when I was last in Holborn, I saw good strawberries in your garden there ; 3 I do beseech you, send for some of them.

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