A dictionary, practical, theoretical, and historical, of commerce and commercial navigation. [With] New and enlarged suppl

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Page 133 - Sykes's hydrometer, and so in proportion for any greater or less strength than the strength of proof, and for any greater or less quantity than a gallon, viz.
Page 74 - Irish patent, certified by his fiat and signature, a disclaimer of any part of either the title of the invention or of the specification, stating the reason for such disclaimer, or may, with such leave as aforesaid, enter a memorandum of any alteration in the said title or specification, not being such disclaimer or such alteration as shall extend the exclusive right granted by the said letters patent...
Page 47 - no state shall emit bills of credit, nor make any thing but gold and silver a tender in payment of debts, nor pass any law which shall impair the obligation of contracts.
Page 144 - British merchants or their agents shall pay, at the purchase and sale of such articles, and in any manner of trade therein, the same duties that are paid in similar circumstances by the most favoured class of Ottoman subjects, or of foreigners engaged in the internal trade of Turkey.
Page 47 - ... the full possession of this power, as an ordinary and usual power of government. I have seen a suggestion, that State loans must be regarded as unconstitutional and illegal, inasmuch as the Constitution of the United States has declared that no State shall emit bills of credit. It is certain that the Constitution of the United States does contain this salutary prohibition ; but what is a bill of credit ? It has no resemblance whatever to a bond, or other security given for the payment of money...
Page 74 - ... on no such manufacture, or published in the county where he carries on such manufacture, or where he lives in case there shall not be any paper published in such town, that he intends to apply to his Majesty in Council for a prolongation...
Page 142 - At the foremost, the middle, and the aftermost of those Points of Division, measure in Feet and Decimal Parts of a Foot the Depths from the under Side of the Upper Deck to the Ceiling at the Limber Strake. In the Case of a Break in the Upper Deck, the Depths are to be measured from a Line stretched in a Continuation of the Deck. Breadths: Divide each of...
Page 47 - ... proves, not that states cannot contract debts, but that, when contracted, they must pay them in coin, according to their stipulations. The several states possess the power of borrowing money for their own internal occasions of expenditure, as fully as Congress possesses the power to borrow in behalf of the United States, for the purpose of raising armies, equipping 'navies, or performing any other of its constitutional duties. It may be added, that Congress itself fully...
Page 142 - Then to twice the midship depth add the foremost and the aftermost depths, for the sum of the depths. Add together the upper and lower breadths at the foremost division, three times the upper breadth and the lower breadth at the midship division...
Page 46 - ... pass a law which is prohibited by its own constitution. But there is no provision in the Constitution of the United States, nor, so far as I know or have understood, in any State constitution, prohibiting the legislature of a State from contracting debts, or making loans either at home or abroad. Every State has the power of levying and collecting taxes, direct and indirect, of all kinds, except that no State can impose duties on goods and merchandise imported, that power belonging exclusively...

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