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MERLIN AND THE GLEAM

And cannot die;

For out of the darkness

Silent and slowly
The Gleam, that had waned to a wintry glimmer
On icy fallow

And faded forest,

Drew to the valley

Named of the shadow,

And slowly brightening

Out of the glimmer, 90 And slowly moving again to a melody Yearningly tender,

Fell on the shadow,

No longer a shadow,
But clothed with The Gleam.

viii.

And broader and brighter
The Gleam flying onward,

Wed to the melody,

Sang thro' the world;

And slower and fainter, roo Old and weary,

But eager to follow,

I saw, whenever

In passing it glanced upon

Hamlet or city,

That under the Crosses
The dead man's garden,

The mortal hillock,

Would break into blossom;

And to the land's rio Last limit I came

And can no longer,

But die rejoicing,

For thro' the Magic

Of Him the Mighty,
Who taught me in childhood,
There on the border

Of boundless Ocean,

And all but in Heaven

Hovers The Gleam. 12 o

ix Not of the sunlight, Not of the moonlight, Not of the starlight!. O young Mariner, Down to the haven, Call your companions, Launch your vessel, And crowd your canvas, And, ere it vanishes Over the margin, 13o After it, follow it, Follow The Gleam.

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BY AN EVOLUTIONIST

The Lord let the house of a brute to the soul of a man, And the man said “Am I your debtor?” And the Lord — “Not yet: but make it as clean as you can, And then I will let you a better.” 4.

If my body come from brutes, my soul uncertain, or a fable, Why not bask amid the senses while the sun of morning shines, I, the finer brute rejoicing in my hounds, and in

my stable, Youth and health, and birth and wealth, and choice of women and of wines? 8

What hast thou done for me, grim Old Age, save breaking my bones on the rack? Would I had past in the morning that looks so bright from afarl

OLD-AGE

Done for thee? starved the wild beast that was linkt with thee eighty years back.

Less weight now for the ladder-of-heaven that

hangs on a star. I 2

If my body come from brutes, tho’ somewhat finer than their own, I am heir, and this my kingdom. Shall the royal voice be mute? No, but if the rebel subject seek to drag me from

the throne, Hold the sceptre, Human Soul, and rule thy Province of the brute. 16

I have climb'd to the snows of Age, and I gaze at a field in the Past, Where I sank with the body at times in the sloughs of a low desire, But I hear no yelp of the beast, and the Man is quiet at last As he stands on the heights of his life with a glimpse of a height that is higher. 2O

CROSSING THE BAR

Sunset and evening star,
And one clear call for me !

And may there be no moaning of the bar,
When I put out to sea, 4.

But such a tide as moving seems asleep,
Too full for sound and foam,
When that which drew from out the boundless
deep
Turns again home. 8

Twilight and evening bell,
And after that the darkl

And may there be no sadness of farewell,
When I embark; I 2

For tho' from out our bourne of Time and Place
The flood may bear me far,

I hope to see my Pilot face to face
When I have crost the bar. 16

ROBERT BROWNING (1812–1889)

CAVALIER TUNES

I. MARCHING ALONG

Kentish Sir Byng stood for his King,
Bidding the crop-headed Parliament swing:
And, pressing a troop unable to stoop
And see the rogues flourish and honest folk droop,
Marched them along, fifty-score strong,
Great-hearted gentlemen, singing this song. 6

God for King Charles! Pym and such carles
To the Devil that prompts 'em their treasonous
parles!
Cavaliers, up ! Lips from the cup,
Hands from the pasty, nor bite take nor sup
Till you're —
CHORUs. – Marching along, fifty-score strong,
Great-hearted gentlemen, singing
this song. 12

Hampden to hell, and his obsequies' knell.
Serve Hazelrig, Fiennes, and young Harry as
well !
England, good cheer! Rupert is near !
Kentish and loyalists, keep we not here,
CHO. — Marching along, fifty-score strong,
Great-hearted gentlemen, singing this
song? 18

Then, God for King Charles
snarls
To the Devil that pricks on such pestilent carles!
Hold by the right, you double your might;

So, onward to Nottingham, fresh for the fight,
CHO. — March we along, fifty-score strong,

Great-hearted gentlemen, singing this

song! 24

Pym and his

II. GIVE A ROUSE

King Charles, and who'll do him right now?
King Charles, and who's ripe for fight now?
Give a rouse: here's, in hell's despite now,
King Charles' - 4

Who gave me the goods that went since? Who raised me the house that sank once? Who helped me to gold I spent since?

Who found me in wine you drank once? - 8 Cho. — King Charles, and who'll do him right

now P King Charles, and who's ripe for fight

now P Give a rouse: here's, in hell's despite

now, King Charles! I

To whom used my boy George quaff else,
By the old fool's side that begot him?
For whom did he cheer and laugh else,

While Noll's damned troopers shot him? 16 Cho. — King Charles, and who'll do him right

now P King Charles, and who's ripe for fight

now P Give a rouse: here's, in hell's despite

now, King Charles! 2d

III. BOOT AND SADDLE

Boot, saddle, to horse, and away!

Rescue my castle before the hot day

Brightens to blue from its silvery grey.
CHO. — Boot, saddle, to horse, and away! 4

Ride past the suburbs, asleep as you'd say;

Many's the friend there, will listen and pray

“God’s luck to gallants that strike up the lay — CHO. — Boot, saddle, to horse, and away!” 8

Forty miles off, like a roebuck at bay,

Flouts Castle Brancepeth the Roundheads' array:

Who laughs, “Good fellows ere this, by my fay,

CHO. — Boot, saddle, to horse, and away!” 1:

Who? My wife Gertrude; that, honest and
gay,
Laughs when you talk of surrendering, “Nay!
I've better counsellors; what counsel they?
CHO. — Boot, saddle, to horse, and away!” 16

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