Translation of the Letters of a Hindoo Rajah;: Written Previous To, and During the Period of His Residence in England. To which is Prefixed, a Preliminary Dissertation on the History, Religion, and Manners, of the Hindoos

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John Walker; Wilkie and Robinson; Longman, Hurst, Rees. Orme and Brown; R. Scholey; A.K. Newman and Company; and J. Johnson and Company, 1811 - England

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Page 266 - Thou hidest thy face, they are troubled : thou takest away- their breath, they die, and return to their dust. Thou sendest forth thy spirit, they are created : and thou renewest the face of the earth.
Page 49 - From seeming evil still educing good, And better thence again, and better still, In infinite progression. But I lose Myself in Him, in light ineffable ! Come then, expressive silence, muse his praise.
Page 48 - tis nought to me; Since God is ever present, ever felt, In the void waste as in the city full; And where He vital breathes, there must be joy.
Page 48 - Should fate command me to the farthest verge Of the green earth, to distant barbarous climes, Rivers unknown to song ! where first the sun Gilds Indian mountains, or his setting beam Flames on th...
Page 168 - ... to believe that the whole creation was rather an energy than a work, by which the Infinite Being who is present at all times and in all places, exhibits to the minds of his creatures a set of perceptions, like a wonderful picture or piece of music, always varied, yet always uniform...
Page 30 - In like manner also, that women adorn themselves in modest apparel, with shame-facedness and sobriety ; not with broidered hair, or gold, or pearls, or costly array ; but (which becometh women professing godliness) with good works.
Page xix - He views in each particular place the mode of worship respectively appointed to it ; sometimes He is employed with the attendants upon the mosque; in counting the sacred beads ; sometimes He is in the temple, at the adoration of idols ; the intimate of the Mussalman, and the friend of the Hindu , the companion of the Christian, and the confidant of the Jew.
Page xxvii - And bids the various warbling throng Burst the pent blossoms with their song. He bends the luscious cane, and twists the string, With bees how sweet ! but ah, how keen their sting ! He with fine flowrets tips thy ruthless darts, Which through five senses pierce enraptured hearts.
Page 167 - Omniscient Spirit, whose all-ruling pow'r Bids from each sense bright emanations beam; Glows in the rainbow, sparkles in the stream, Smiles in the bud, and glistens in the flow'r That crowns each vernal bow'r; Sighs in the gale, and warbles in the throat Of...
Page 263 - I was anxious to improve the light, directed me four or five miles farther on my way to the dwelling of a man whose name was Rice, who occupied the last and highest of the valleys that lay in my path, and who, they said, was a rather rude and uncivil man. But "what is a foreign country to those who have science? Who is a stranger to those who have the habit of speaking kindly?

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