How England Saved Europe: The war in the Peninsula

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Page 264 - Nothing could stop that astonishing infantry. No sudden burst of undisciplined valour, no nervous enthusiasm weakened the stability of their order, their flashing eyes were bent on the dark columns in their front, their measured tread shook the ground, their dreadful volleys swept away the head of every formation, their deafening shouts overpowered the dissonant cries that broke from all parts of the tumultuous crowd...
Page 264 - ... bent on the dark columns in their front; their measured tread shook the ground; their dreadful volleys swept away the head of every formation; their deafening shouts overpowered the dissonant cries that broke from all parts of the tumultuous crowd, as foot by foot and with a horrid carnage it was driven by the incessant vigour of the attack to the farthest edge of the hill.
Page 424 - Introductions to the Works are supplied by Mrs. HUMPHRY WARD, and an Introduction and Notes to Mrs. GASKELL'S " Life of Charlotte Bronte,
Page 263 - In vain did Soult, by voice and gesture, animate his Frenchmen ; in vain did the hardiest veterans, extricating themselves from the crowded columns, sacrifice their lives to gain time for the mass to open out on such a fair field ; in vain did the mass itself bear up, and fiercely striving, fire indiscriminately upon friends and foes, while the horsemen hovering on the flank threatened to charge the advancing line.
Page 51 - Tis enough to make one thoughtful ; but no matter : my die is cast, they may overwhelm me, but I don't think they will outmanoeuvre me. First, because I am not afraid of them, as everybody else seems to be ; and secondly, because if what I hear of their system of manoeuvres be true, I think it a false one as against steady troops. I suspect all the continental armies were more than half beaten before the battle was begun. I, at least, will not be frightened beforehand.
Page 423 - I return you many thanks for the honour you have done me; but Europe is not to be saved by any single man. England has saved herself by her exertions, and will, as I trust, save Europe by her example.
Page 424 - Illustrations. 5. WUTHERING HEIGHTS. By. EMILY BRONTE. AGNES GREY. By ANNE BRONTE. With a Preface and Biographical Notice of both Authors by CHARLOTTE BRONTE.
Page 424 - BLAND, of Duffield, Derby, in conjunction with Mr. C. BARROW KEENE, of Derby. Introductions to the Works are supplied by Mrs. HUMPHRY WARD, AND An Introduction and Notes to Mrs. Gaskell's ' Life of Charlotte Bronte
Page 386 - Behind them was the plain in which the city stood, and beyond the city, thousands of carriages, and animals, and non-combatants ; men, women, and children were crowding together, in all the madness of terror, and as the English shot went booming overhead...
Page 269 - Picton took off his hat, and holding it over his eyes as a shade from the sun, looked sternly but anxiously at the French. The clatter of the horses, and the clanking of the scabbards...

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