A Flora of Herefordshire, Part 1

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William Phillips, 1867 - Geology - 25 pages
 

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Page 14 - Wye has altered its course, and destroyed and reformed its alluvia over and over again, without having encroached npon the land bounding the alluvium, to any appreciable degree, for many past ages. From the excavations of the Severn alluvium, we infer that there was a time when the Severn flowed, as the river Shannon does now, through a chain of various sized lakes. The lacustrine silt has been penetrated in two or three instances, and lies some forty feet below the alluvium of the Severn. The lake...
Page 10 - ... shown to be much faulted and brought up against Upper Ludlow shales and Aymestry rocks. The Wenlock shales and the Wenlock limestone are then traversed ; these are much faulted, the Lower Ludlow beds again coming in, followed by Aymestry rock, Upper Ludlow shales, Downton sandstone, and, at the east end of the tunnel, by red and mottled marls, grey shales and grits, purple shales and sandstones, with the Auchenaspis-beds, forming the passage-beds into the Old Red Sandstone, as described in a...
Page 23 - In geology which it is impossible to condense, and the student must make up his mind, if he would understand them, to become thoroughly acquainted with the phenomena themselves. In notes necessarily so brief as these, we can do nothing but give a few hints respecting...
Page 6 - Marclo ; the remainder oí the eastern boundary is formed by the county of Gloucester. GEOLOGY. — The Woolhope district is one of the most remarkable geological districts in Great Britain. It is an example of the elevation of a large tract of underlying strata, the Upper Silurian strata...
Page 7 - Mordiford, at the north of this district, is well worthy of the attention of geologists, as it is the only locality where any amount of debris is collected of the immense masses of rock that have been denuded.
Page 14 - Aconbury, rising on every side. This appears to be the place to allude to the drifts of Herefordshire, those relics of ancient rivers, lakes, and even sea straits, which appertaining to the more recent of geological phenomena, belong, nevertheless, to periods which, chronologically speaking, were immensely remote. I have endeavoured, in another pamphlet, to correlate, though I fear roughly and imperfectly, certain of the phenomena displayed by the Worcestershire and Herefordshire drifts j* can only...
Page 22 - Bradnor were beneath a sea traTersed by ice-bergs and ice-floes transporting those rock masses. NO. 14. THE BLACK MOUNTAIN DISTEICT. This consists of the extreme western portion of our county, and, as the name given to it will shew, it contains within its area such portion of the Black Mountain ranges as belongs to Herefordshire. It is separated from District 13 by the...
Page 9 - Malvoru, and MR. TURNER, of Pauntley. PROFESSOR PHILLIPS was the first to discover these fossils, several years ago. Agnostus, which is an important form of crustacean, for it is a form found in the Lingula Flags of Sweden and America, as well as of Great Britain, was first detected here by the late MR. HUGH STRICKLAND. Again, we...
Page 8 - Silurian rocks, as also does Tarrington village, and the Foley Arms Inn. The upper Silurians rising through Old Eed rocks, may be seen at many localities on the south of the village of Fownhope. Capler Wood and Nash •Tump on the west, Putley, and Little Marcle on the east of Woolhope dome, are on the Old Eed.

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