Sugar: A Bitterweet History

Front Cover
Overlook, Apr 1, 2010 - History - 464 pages
18 Reviews
Sugar: A Bittersweet History is a compelling and surprising look at the sweet commodity, from how it Africanized the cane fields of the Caribbean to how it fuelled the Industrial Revolution and jumpstarted the fast- food revolution. The book explores the hidden stories behind this sweet product, revealing how powerful American interests deposed Queen Lilišuokalani of Hawaii, how Hitler tried to ensure a steady supply of beet sugar when enemies threatened to cut off Germanyšs supply of overseas cane sugar, and how South Africa established a domestic ethanol industry in the wake of anti-apartheid sugar embargos. The book follows the history of sugar to the present day, showing how sugar made eating on the run socially acceptable and played an integral role in todayšs fast food culture and obesity epidemic.

Impressively researched and commandingly written, Sugar will forever change perceptions of this sweet treat.

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Review: Sugar: A Bittersweet History

User Review  - Chelsea - Goodreads

Okay, but everything except the sugar industry in the Caribbean prior to the abolition of slavery was crammed into less than one-quarter of the book, and for the first three quarters, the focus was ... Read full review

Review: Sugar: A Bittersweet History

User Review  - Lukas Evan - Goodreads

As much about slavery, capitalism, and colonialism as about sugar. Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Elizabeth Abbott is Research Associate at Trinity College, University of Toronto, and, from 1991 to 2004, was Dean of Women. She is the author of several books, including Sugar and Haiti, also published by Overlook. She lives in Toronto.

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