A Ride to India Across Persia and Baluchistan

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Chapman and Hall, limited, 1891 - Balochistān (Pakistan) - 339 pages
 

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Page 192 - In the recesses of the walls are many bouquets in vases. The one great window — a miracle of intricate carpentry, some twenty feet by twenty — blazes with a geometrical pattern of tiny pieces of glass, forming one gorgeous mosaic. Three of the sashes of this window are thrown up to admit air; the coloured glass of the top and four remaining sashes effectually shuts out excess of light.
Page 244 - Here, on the day in question, Prince Kumal called a halt. A couple of small tents were pitched, and a meal, consisting of an excellent curry, stewed pigeons, beer, and claret, served. Leaving the Prince to amuse himself and delight his followers with his skill in rifle-shooting at a mark chalked out on the rocks, I continued my explorations. The result is, perhaps, better explained to the reader in the words of an older and more experienced observer. Carless says — "The scene was singular. On either...
Page 178 - Bourdonnais himself had refused to land ; they declined to proceed on board his ship, as he requested, to discuss matters together. Neither party, in fact, would trust the other. Under these circumstances, it is scarcely to be wondered at, that the tenor of the reply to La Bourdonnais' proposition went simply to reiterate to orders, which had directed the squadron to proceed to Acheen.
Page 286 - Chupao is to commence, and then halt in a jungul or some unfrequented spot, in order to give their camels rest. On the approach of night, they mount again; and, as soon as the inhabitants have retired to repose, they begin their attack by burning, destroying, and carrying off whatever comes in their way. They never think of resting for one moment during the Chupao, but ride on, over the territory on which it is made, at the rate of eighty or ninety miles a day, until they have loaded their camels...
Page 292 - ... which stands 6800 feet above sea-level, the extreme maximum heat as yet recorded during the months of July and August is only 103 deg. Fahr., while the extreme minimum during the same months is as low as 48 deg. Fahr. In winter the cold is intense. Pottinger, the traveller, relates that on the 7th of February, 1810, when at Baghivana, five marches from Kelat, his waterskins were frozen into masses of ice, and seven days afterwards, at Kelat, he found the frost so intense that water froze instantly...
Page 286 - ... the Chupao, but ride on, over the territory on which it is made, at the rate of eighty or ninety miles a day, until they have loaded their camels with as much pillage as they can possibly remove ; and, as they are very expert in the management of those animals, each man, on an average, will have charge of ten or twelve : if practicable, they make a circuit, which enables them to return by a different route from the one they came : this is attended with the advantage of affording a double prospect...
Page 192 - Palace, as they appeared in their first splendour before the great fire there, I exactly describe it. A priceless carpet, surrounded by felt edgings, two inches thick and a yard wide, appears like a lovely but subdued picture artfully set in a sombre frame. In the recesses of the walls are many bouquets in glass vases. The one great window — a miracle of intricate carpentry, some twenty feet by twenty — blazes with a geometrical pattern of tiny pieces of glass, forming one gorgeous mosaic. Three...
Page 158 - By good luck and the aid of lucifer matches, we managed to trace our ponies to a piece of cultivated ground hard by, where we found them calmly feeding in a field of standing corn. The moon had risen by nine o'clock. Before half-past we were in sight of the rock on which stands the town of Yezdi-Ghazt, towering, shadowy and indistinct, over the moonlit plain. This is unquestionably the most curious and interesting village between Resht and Bushire. The post-house stands at the foot. As we rode to...
Page 243 - Beyla a range of low hills sweeps in a semi-circle from one side of the valley to the other and forms its head. The Poorally river issues from a deep ravine on the western side, and is about 200 yards broad. It is bounded on one side by steep cliffs, 40 or 50 feet high, on the summit of which there is an ancient...

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