Maat, the Moral Ideal in Ancient Egypt: A Study in Classical African Ethics

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2004 - History - 458 pages
Maat is the moral ideal of ancient Egypt whose texts contain information on Egypt's moral standards, its concepts of right from wrong, codes of behaviour and obligations. Written by a teacher of the tradition of Maat, this study is the `first philosophical book that is based on a philologically and historically critical treatment of first-hand Egyptian material'. Focusing on the Maatian ideal rather than moral practices, Karenga discusses what Maat is and its place within the genre of philosophical ethics and morality, asking what it can contribute to modern African culture and values. Extracts are transcribed and translated into English.
 

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Contents

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About the author (2004)

Dr. Maulana Karenga is professor and chair of the Department of Black Studies at California State University, Long Beach. He is also chair of the President's Task Force on Multicultural Education and Campus Diversity at California State University, Long Beach. Dr. Karenga holds two Ph.D.'s; his first in political science with focus on the theory and practice of nationalism (United States International University) and his second in social ethics with a focus on the classical African ethics of ancient Egypt (University of Southern California).

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