Massasoit of the Wampanoags: With a Brief Commentary on Indian Character; and Sketches of Other Great Chiefs, Tribes and Nations; Also a Chapter on Samoset, Squanto and Hobamock, Three Early Native Friends of the Plymouth Colonists

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Priv. Print. [The Plimpton Press], 1919 - Algonquin Indians - 270 pages
Containing an overview of the Wampanoag tribe and the Plymouth Colony, Massasoit of the Wampanoags discusses the life of tribe leader Massasoit. Massasoit was born in present-day Rhode Island, fathered five children, became the leader of the Wampanoag tribe, and ultimately prevented the failure of the Plymouth Colony and the almost certain death and starvation of the Pilgrims who wished to settle there. When Wampanoag member Squanto left the tribe to aid the settlers in growing corn and other vegetables to live sustainably, Massasoit believed the man had betrayed him and his people. There was great tension between Massasoit and the colonists after the Pilgrims refused to hand over Squanto at Massasoit's command. Later in the year, this conflict was resolved when Massasoit grew ill and Edward Winslow of the Plymouth Colony nursed him to health. From then until his death, Massasoit continued to supply the Pilgrims with food and helpful instruction.
 

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Page 124 - And turning him to me, said, whilst I lived, I should never see his like amongst the Indians ; saying, he was no liar, he was not bloody and cruel, like other Indians ; in anger and passion he was soon reclaimed ; easy to be reconciled towards such as had offended him ; ruled by reason in such measure as he would not scorn the advice of mean men ; and that he governed his men better with few strokes, than others did with many ; truly loving where he loved ; yea, he feared we had not a faithful friend...
Page 64 - Hearken to the words of your father. I am an old oak, that has withstood the storms of more than a hundred winters. Leaves and branches have been stripped from me by the winds and frosts, — my eyes are dim, — my limbs totter, — I must soon fall ! But when young and sturdy, when my bow no young man of the Pennacooks could...
Page 23 - ... a hand bountiful to bestow, as it is rapacious to seize, and, even in extremest famine, imparting its last morsel to a fellow-sufferer; a heart which, strong in friendship as in hate, thinks it not too much to lay down life for its chosen comrade; a soul true to its own idea of honor, and burning with an unquenchable thirst for greatness and renown.
Page 25 - Their van will be upon us Before the bridge goes down; And if they once may win the bridge, What hope to save the town? ' Then out spake brave Horatius, The Captain of the gate : 'To every man upon this earth Death cometh soon or late; And how can man die better Than facing fearful odds, For the ashes of his fathers And the temples of his Gods...
Page 149 - He directed them how to set their corne, wher to take fish, and to procure other comodities, and was also their pilott to bring them to unknowne places for their profitt, and never left them till he dyed.
Page 173 - Bradford says they also agreed that "if any of the Nayantick Pequots should make any assault upon Uncas or any of his, they would give them up to the English to be punished, and that they would not procure the Mowacks to come against him during this truce." I have spoken of this agreement as of the time of the Narragansetts' complaint in the winter following Miantonomo's death, although some writers fix the time of its making as coincident with the mockery of a trial that was accorded to Miantonomo....
Page 22 - Races of inferior energy have possessed a power of expansion and assimilation to which he is a stranger; and it is this fixed and rigid quality which has proved his ruin. He will not learn the arts of civilization, and he...
Page 78 - ... the question; Montaup, corrupted by the English into Mount Hope in Bristol, Rhode Island; and Kickemuit on the river of the same name, and within the limits of the present town of Swansea, Massachusetts. Let us now return to a further consideration of the numerical strength of the Wampanoags in the early part of the seventeenth century; and, having referred briefly to what we may properly consider the minimum estimate, we will pass to the other extreme, and then by examining all the known facts,...
Page 264 - Church had been there, and had taken his wife, children and company, and carried them down to Plymouth ; and would spare all their lives, and his too, if he would come down to them and bring the other two that were with him, and they should be his soldiers, &c. Capt. Church then returned to Plymouth, leaving the old squaws well provided for, and bisket for Tispaquin when he returned.
Page 48 - On the north, they uprooted the ancient settlements of the Wyandots. On the west, they exterminated the Eries and the Andastes, and spread havoc and dismay among the tribes of the Illinois ; and on the east, the Indians of New England fled at the first peal of the Mohawk war-cry. " Nor was it the Indian race alone who quailed before their ferocious valor. All Canada shook with the desolating fury of their onset...

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