Participation: the New Tyranny?

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Zed Books, Jun 23, 2001 - Business & Economics - 207 pages
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This book shows how participatory government can lead to the unjust and illegitimate exercise of power. It addresses the gulf between the almost universally fashionable rhetoric of participation, promising empowerment and appropriate development. Looking at what actually happens when consultants and activists promote and practice participatory development, this book offers a sharp challenge to the advocates of participatory development. Some contributors look at particular examples of failed participatory practice; others present more conceptually-oriented analyses. Together they provide a new, rigorous, and provocative understanding of participatory development.
 

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Contents

The Case for Participation as Tyranny
1
Why tyranny?
3
The limits of internal critiques
4
What the book says
7
Is tyranny inevitable?
13
Peoples Knowledge Participation and Patronage Operations and Representations in Rural Development
16
Participation and bureaucratic planning
17
Operation and representation
26
The Abilene paradox
108
Groupthink
112
Coercive persuasion
116
Conclusion
120
Insights into Participation from Critical Management and Labour Process Perspectives
122
comparable dependencies?
123
Employee involvement and participation in orthodox managerial thinking
126
Radical critiques of employee participation and involvement
129

Conclusions
32
Institutions Agency and the Limitations of Participatory Approaches to Development
36
Institutionalism
39
Model of individuals
47
reassessing participatory approaches
53
Pluralism Participation and Power Joint Forest Management in India
56
Participation and forest management
57
Joint forest management
61
Village forest committees
63
Power participation and political space
68
Participatory Development at the World Bank the Primacy of Process
72
Participatory rural appraisal
75
Community and professional in the production of participation
78
Uptake in the World Bank
84
Beyond the Formulaic Process and Practice in South Asian NGOs
88
case studies of South Asian NGOs
90
Conclusion
100
The Social Psychological Limits of Participation?
102
Risky shift
106
Power Knowledge and Social Control in Participatory Development
139
Reassertion of power and social control
142
Building consensus and the reification of social norms
145
The purification of knowledge and space
146
Participation as performance and the possibilities of subversion
148
Conclusion
151
Beyond Participation Strategies for Deeper Empowerment
153
The pitfalls of participatory research
158
Alternative possibilities of going local
163
Participation as Spiritual Duty Empowerment as Secular Subjection
168
The new orthodoxy
170
Genealogies of participation
172
Participation as religious experience
175
Empowerment
178
Conclusion
182
Bibliography
185
Index
201
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About the author (2001)

Uma Kothari is a development consultant, trained originally as a geographer, and now teaching at the Institute for Development Policy and Management, University of Manchester. She has conducted research in various parts of the world, including India, Central America and parts of West Africa.She is currently co-director of a DfID-funded project, Social Development: Systems for Coordinated Poverty Eradication. She has contributed chapters to various books in recent years.Bill Cooke lectures in Human Resources Development at the Institute for Development Policy and Management, University of Manchester. He specialises in various aspects of management, having begun his career as a management consultant in the public sector in Britain. He subsequently set up his own consultancy business, and became a business school academic in 1992.

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