Cambrensis eversus, seu potius Historica fides in rebus hibernicis Giraldo Cambrensi abrogata: in quo plerasque justi historici dotes desiderari, plerosque nŠvos inesse, ˇstendit Gratianus Lucius, Hibernus [pseud.] qui etiam aliquot res memorabiles hibernicas veteris et novŠ memoriŠ passim e re nata huic operi inseruit ...

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Page 303 - Their throat is an open sepulchre; with their tongues they have used deceit; the poison of asps is under their lips: whose mouth is full of cursing and bitterness: their feet are swift to shed blood: destruction and misery are in their ways: and the way of peace have they not known: there is no fear of God before their eyes.
Page 347 - But I say to you not to resist evil: but if one strike thee on thy right cheek, turn to him also the other: and if a man will contend with thee in judgment, and take away thy coat, let go thy cloak also unto him.
Page 5 - Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel; for he hath visited and wrought redemption for his people, and hath raised up a horn of salvation for us in the house of his servant David (as he spake by the mouth of his holy prophets which have been since the world began), salvation from our enemies, and from the hand of all that hate us...
Page 225 - In a word, if the English would neither in peace govern them by the law, nor could in war root them out by the sword, must they not needs be pricks in their eyes and thorns in their sides till the world's end...
Page 5 - ... magnify and glorify the King of Heaven; because all His works are true and His ways judgments, and they that walk in pride He is able to abase.
Page 231 - Ireland cantonised among ten persons of the English nation. And though they had not gained the possession of one-third part of the whole kingdom, yet in title they were owners and lords of all, so as nothing was left to be granted to the natives.
Page 63 - The answer of Henry Cromwell is as follows : — ' Concerning the supply of young men, although we must use force in taking them up, yet it being so much for their own good, and likely to be of so great advantage to the public, it is not...
Page 221 - ... they should be other than outlaws and enemies to the Crown of England ? If the King would not admit them to the condition of subjects, how could they learn to acknowledge and obey him as their Sovereign ? When they might not converse or commerce with any civil...
Page 217 - Whereby it is manifest that such as had the government of Ireland under the Crown of England did intend to make a perpetual separation and enmity between the English and the Irish...
Page 229 - ... they persuaded the King of England that it was unfit to communicate the laws of England unto them ; that it was the best policy to hold them as aliens and enemies, and to prosecute them with a continual war.