Brownson's Quarterly Review, Volume 3

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Orestes Augustus Brownson
Benjamin H. Greene, 1849 - American essays
 

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Page 222 - Seek ye therefore first the Kingdom of God and His justice, and all these things shall be added unto you.
Page 455 - The prophet that hath a dream, let him tell a dream; and he that hath my word, let him speak my word faithfully. What is the chaff to the wheat ? saith the Lord.
Page 464 - So the FATHER is GOD, the SON is GOD: and the HOLY GHOST is GOD. And yet there are not three GODS : but one GOD.
Page 424 - Talibus orabat dictis, arasque tenebat, Cum sic orsa loqui vates : 'Sate sanguine divom, 125 Tros Anchisiada, facilis descensus Averno; Noctes atque dies patet atri janua Ditis; Sed revocare gradum superasque evadere ad auras, Hoc opus, hie labor est.
Page 426 - the whole head is sick, and the whole heart faint ; from the sole of the foot to the crown of the head, there is no soundness in it, but wounds, and bruises, and putrifying sores.
Page 314 - Ave Maria! blessed be the hour, The time, the clime, the spot, where I so oft Have felt that moment in its fullest power Sink o'er the earth so beautiful and soft...
Page 267 - I behold in thee An image of Him who died on the tree; Thou also hast had thy crown of thorns, — Thou also hast had the world's buffets and scorns, — And to thy life were not denied The wounds in the hands and feet and side: Mild Mary's Son, acknowledge me; Behold, through him, I give to thee!
Page 548 - THE STARS AND THE EARTH; OR THOUGHTS UPON SPACE, TIME, AND ETERNITY.
Page 407 - And if it seem evil unto you to serve the LORD, choose you this day whom ye will serve ; whether the gods which your fathers* served that were on the other side of the flood, "t* or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land ye dwell : but as for me and my house, we will serve the LORD.
Page 268 - t was red wine he drank with his thirsty soul. As Sir Launfal mused with a downcast face, A light shone round about the place; The leper no longer crouched at his side, But stood before him glorified, Shining and tall and fair and straight As the pillar that stood by the Beautiful Gate, — Himself the Gate whereby men can Enter the temple of God in Man.

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