William Cowper, sein naturgefühl und seine naturdichtung: Ein beitrag zur geschichte des naturgefühls in England ...

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Lehmannsche buchdruckerei, 1901 - Nature in literature - 139 pages

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Page 99 - How soft the music of those village bells Falling at intervals upon the ear In cadence sweet ! now dying all away, Now pealing loud again and louder still, Clear and sonorous as the gale comes on.
Page 13 - ... bowers to lay me down; To husband out life's taper at the close, And keep the flame from wasting by repose; I still had hopes — for pride attends us still — Amidst the swains to show my...
Page 70 - Knowledge and wisdom, far from being one, Have ofttimes no connection. Knowledge dwells In heads replete with thoughts of other men, Wisdom in minds attentive to their own.
Page 77 - Yon cottager, who weaves at her own door, Pillow and bobbins all her little store: Content though mean, and cheerful if not gay, Shuffling her threads about the livelong day, Just earns a scanty pittance, and at night Lies down secure, her heart and pocket light...
Page 50 - Through the cleft rock, and, chiming as they fall Upon loose pebbles, lose themselves at length In matted grass, that with a livelier green Betrays the secret of their silent course, Nature inanimate employs sweet sounds, But animated nature sweeter still, To soothe and satisfy the human ear.
Page 49 - Nor rural sights alone, but rural sounds, Exhilarate the spirit, and restore The tone of languid Nature. Mighty winds, That sweep the skirt of some far-spreading wood Of ancient growth, make music not unlike The dash of Ocean on his winding shore, And lull the spirit while they fill the mind ; Unnumber'd branches waving in the blast, And all their leaves fast fluttering, all at once.
Page 57 - I see a column of slow-rising smoke O'ertop the lofty wood that skirts the wild. A vagabond and useless tribe there eat Their miserable meal. A kettle, slung Between two poles upon a stick transverse, Receives the morsel ; flesh obscene of dog, Or vermin, or, at best, of cock purloined From his accustomed perch.
Page 118 - The path of sorrow, and that path alone, Leads to the land where sorrow is unknown ; No traveller ever reach'd that blest abode, Who found not thorns and briers in his road.
Page 56 - tis the twanging horn ! o'er yonder bridge, That with its wearisome but needful length Bestrides the wintry flood, in which the moon Sees her unwrinkled face reflected bright, He comes, the herald of a noisy world, With spatter'd boots, strapp'd waist, and frozen locks ; News from all nations lumbering at his back.
Page 98 - My panting side was charged, when I withdrew, To seek a tranquil death in distant shades.

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