The Handy Volume "Waverly" ...: Guy Mannering

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Bradbury, Agnew, 1877

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Page 24 - The intelligible forms of ancient poets, The fair humanities of old religion, The power, the beauty, and the majesty, That had their haunts in dale, or piny mountain, Or forest by slow stream, or pebbly spring, Or chasms and watery depths; all these have vanished; They live no longer in the faith of reason.
Page 49 - In years of plenty many thousands of them meet together in the mountains, where they feast and riot for many days; and at country weddings, markets, burials, and other the like public occasions, they are to be seen both men and women perpetually drunk, cursing, blaspheming, and fighting together.
Page 110 - It is the signal that demands despatch. How much is to be done! My hopes and fears Start up alarmed, and o'er life's narrow verge Look down — on what ? a fathomless abyss...
Page 31 - ... shades of joy and woe, Hope, and fear, and peace, and strife, In the thread of human life. While the mystic twist is spinning. And the infant's life beginning, Dimly seen through twilight bending, Lo, what varied shapes attending ! Passions wild, and follies vain. Pleasures soon exchanged for pain; Doubt, and jealousy, and fear, In the magic dance appear. Now they wax, and now they dwindle, Whirling with the whirling spindle.
Page 61 - ... cradle at hame be the fairer spread up : not that I am wishing ill to little Harry, or to the babe that's yet to be born — God forbid — and make them kind to the poor, and better folk than their father ! — And now, ride e'en your ways ; for these are the last words ye'll ever hear Meg Merrilies speak, and this is the last reise * that I'll ever cut in the bonny woods of Ellangowan.
Page 308 - A lawyer without history or literature is a mechanic, a mere working mason ; if he possesses some knowledge of these, he may venture to call himself an architect.
Page 156 - Some, indeed, of belles lettres, poems, plays, or memoirs he tossed indignantly aside, with the implied censure of " psha, " or " frivolous" ; but the greater and bulkier part of the collection bore a very different character. The deceased prelate, a divine of the old and deeplylearned cast, had loaded his shelves with volumes which displayed the antique and venerable attributes so happily described by a modern poet : That weight of wood, with leathern coat o'erlaid. Those ample clasps of solid metal...

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