Works of Michael de Montaigne: Comprising His Essays, Journey Into Italy, and Letters, with Notes from All the Commentators, Biographical and Bibliographical Notices, Etc, Volume 1

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 349 - Let others better mould the running mass Of metals, and inform the breathing brass, And soften into flesh, a marble face; Plead better at the bar; describe the skies, And when the stars descend, and when they rise. But Rome! 'tis thine alone, with awful sway, To rule mankind, and make the world obey, Disposing peace and war, thy own majestic way: To tame the proud, the fettered slave to free: — These are imperial arts, and worthy thee.
Page 234 - After having taught him what will make him more wise and good, you may then entertain him with the elements of logic, physics, geometry, rhetoric, and the science which he shall then himself most incline to, his judgment being beforehand formed and fit to choose, he will quickly make his own. The way of instructing him ought to be sometimes by discourse, and sometimes by reading; sometimes his governor shall put the author himself, which he shall think most proper for him., into his hands, and sometimes...
Page 161 - For, in truth, custom is a violent and treacherous schoolmistress. She, by little and little, slily and unperceived, slips in the foot of her authority, but having by this gentle and humble beginning, with the benefit of time, fixed and established it, she then unmasks a furious and tyrannic countenance, against which we have no more the courage or the power so much as to lift up our eyes.
Page 60 - O'er my dim eyes a darkness hung ; My ears with hollow murmurs rung. In dewy damps my limbs were chill'd ; My blood with gentle horrors thrill'd ; My feeble pulse forgot to play ; I fainted, sunk, and died away.
Page 217 - But, in truth, all I understand as to that particular is only this, that the greatest and most important difficulty of human science is the education of children.
Page 296 - This is a nation, I should say to Plato, in which there is no sort of traffic, no knowledge of letters, no science of numbers, no name for a magistrate or for political superiority, no custom of servitude, no riches or poverty, no contracts, no successions, no partitions, no occupations but leisure ones, no care for any but common kinship, no clothes, no agriculture, no metal, no use of wine or wheat.
Page 219 - ... turn. Socrates, and since him Arcesilaus, made first their scholars speak and then they spoke to them. The authority of those who teach is very often an impediment to those who desire to learn.
Page 139 - Life in itself is neither good nor evil; it is the scene of good or evil, as you make it. And, if you have lived a day, you have seen all ; one day is equal and like to all other days. There is...
Page 385 - Who then is free ? The wise, who well maintains An empire o'er himself: whom neither chains, Nor want, nor death, with slavish fear inspire; Who boldly answers to his warm desire ; Who can ambition's vainest gifts despise; Firm in himself who on himself relies ; Polish'd and round who runs his proper course, And breaks misfortune with superior force.
Page 471 - ... who entered like a fox, reigned like a lion, and died like a dog.

Bibliographic information