A Voyage to St. Kilda: The Remotest of All the Hebrides Or Western Isles of Scotland : Giving an Account of the Very Remarkable Inhabitants ...

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Dan. Browne ... and Lockyer Davis, 1753 - Saint Kilda (Scotland) - 79 pages

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User Review  - john257hopper - LibraryThing

I have been fascinated for several years by this remote Scottish island which was inhabited by a small community until 1930 when the last remaining islanders were evacuated at their own request as ... Read full review

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Page 35 - Every fowl lays an egg three different times except the Gair-fowl and Fulmar, which lay but once ; if the first or second egg be taken away, every fowl lays but one other egg that year, except the seamalls, and they ordinarily lay the third egg, whether the first and second eggs be taken away, or no. The inhabitants observe, that when the April moon goes far in May, the fowls are ten or twelve days later in laying their eggs, than ordinarily they use to be.
Page 60 - ... and exact three eggs, or one of the lesser fowls from each man as a reward for his service; this by them is called the Fire-Penny, and this Capitation is very uneasy to them...
Page 10 - Lavy, and a greater number of the lesser eggs, as they differed in proportion; the largest of these eggs is near in bigness to that of a Goose, the rest of the eggs gradually of a lesser size. We had the curiosity after three weeks...
Page 66 - ... people in the Golden Age is feigned by the poets to be, that theirs really is, I mean, in innocency and simplicity, purity, mutual love and cordial friendship, free from solicitous cares, and anxious covetousness; from envy, deceit, and dissimulation; from ambition and pride, and the consequences that attend them. They are altogether ignorant of the vices of foreigners, and governed by the dictates of reason and Christianity, as it was first delivered to them by those heroic souls whose zeal...
Page 66 - ... what the condition of the people in the golden age is feigned by the poets to be, that theirs really is; I mean, in. innocency and simplicity, purity, mutual love, and cordial friendship ; free from solicitous cares, and anxious covetousness ; from envy, deceit, and dissimulation ; from ambition and .pride, and the consequences that attend them.
Page 27 - ... breast, ie a bare spot from which the feathers have fallen off with the heat in hatching; its egg is twice as big as that of a Solan goose, and is variously spotted, black, green, and dark ; it comes without regard 'to any wind, appears the first of May, and goes away about the middle of June.
Page 1 - Voyage to St Kilda, the remotest of all the Hebrides, or Western Isles of Scotland: giving an Account of the very remarkable Inhabitants of that Place, their Beauty and singular...
Page 20 - Thumb, which is so little, that of all the parts of a man's body the thumb only can lay hold on it, and that must be only for the space of one minute ; during which time his feet have no support, nor any part of his body touches the stone, except the thumb, in which minute he...
Page 40 - ... for some end, but here there was no room for any, where nothing could be proposed ; but for confirmation of the whole, they appealed to the case of infants at the breast, who...
Page 48 - Inhabitants think long enough; the Daily Allowance paid by them is very regularly exacted, with Regard to their refpective Proportions of Lands and Rocks.

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