The Slave colonies of Great Britain; or, A picture of Negro slavery drawn by the colonists themselves: being an abstract of the various papers recently laid before Parliament on that subject

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Page 131 - It is in the nature of things that they should be so. — Let then the British House of Commons do their part themselves ! — Let them not delegate the trust of doing it to those who cannot execute that trust fairly ! — Let the evil be remedied by an assembly of freemen, by the government of a free people, and not by the masters of slaves. Their laws can never reach, could never cure the evil.
Page 102 - It were good therefore that men in their innovations would follow the example of time itself, which indeed innovateth greatly, but quietly and by degrees scarce to be perceived...
Page 8 - ... be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction shall be punished by fine or imprisonment or both at the discretion of the court; such fine not to exceed one hundred dollars, and such imprisonment not to exceed sixty days.
Page 131 - NEVER CURE the EVIL. There is something in the nature of absolute authority, in the relation! between Master and Slave, which makes despotism in ALL cases, and under ALL circumstances, an incompetent and unsure executor, even of its own provisions in favour of the objects of its power.
Page 32 - If it be asked, Are there not authorities to whom the injured slaves can appeal for redress ? The answer is in the affirmative. But many of the legally constituted authorities are themselves owners of plantations, following the same system, and perhaps, by means of their managers, practising the same abuses on their own slaves. Judging from their conduct, it would seem that some of them consider it a greater crime for the negroes to complain of their wrongs, than for the master to inflict them.
Page 85 - I am happy in being able to assure your Lordship, that a very general wish to ameliorate the condition of the Slaves, and to instruct them in the principles of the Established Church, seems to pervade the great mass of Proprietors, and every facility is afforded me of visiting the several plantations.
Page 11 - Ibid. p. 10. ^ 52 — 54. A slave aiding a slave to depart from the Bahama islands, shall suffer transportation, or any other punishment, not extending to life and limb. A Free Negro or Person of Colour, doing so, shall be subject to transportation ; and, if afterwards found at large, to death, without benefit of clergy. A White doing so, shall forfeit 100.
Page 140 - That through a determined and persevering, but, at the same time, judicious and temperate enforcement of such measures, this House looks forward to a progressive improvement in the character of the slave population, such as may prepare them for a participation in those civil rights and privileges which are enjoyed by other classes of his Majesty's subjects.
Page 51 - The conduct of the latter evinced a warm interest in the welfare of the colony, and every way identified them with those who are the most zealous promoters of its internal security.
Page 153 - ... a long time, he was severely attacked by the scurvy, and although he begged hard to be allowed to go out and wash himself, was refused : he grew so ill, that his master was afraid of losing him, and therefore released him ; he recovered, although very visible marks remain on his back: whilst in the stocks, his master gave him nothing to eat ; whatever he got was by favour of the Negroes ; he was not allowed to go out and ease himself, but lived in such a manner that it was impossible for any...

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