The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL. D., Comprehending an Account of His Studies, and Numerous Works, in Chronological Order: A Series of His Epistolary Correspondence and Conversations with Many Eminent Persons; and Various Original Pieces of His Composition, Never Before Published; the Whole Exhibiting a View of Literature and Literary Men in Great Britain, for Near Half a Century During which He Flourished, Volume 4

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G. Cowie, 1824
 

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Page 395 - Canst thou not minister to a mind diseas'd ; Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow; Raze out the written troubles of the brain ; And with some sweet oblivious antidote Cleanse the stuffd bosom of that perilous stuff Which weighs upon the heart?
Page 273 - Forbearing one another, and forgiving one another, if any man have a quarrel against any: even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye. And above all these things put on charity, which is the bond of perfectness.
Page 100 - ... sometimes it is couched in a bold scheme of speech ; in a tart irony ; in a lusty hyperbole ; in a startling metaphor ; in a plausible reconciling of contradictions, or in acute nonsense : sometimes a scenical representation of persons or things, a counterfeit speech, a...
Page 16 - He used frequently to observe, that men might be very eminent in a profession, without our perceiving any particular power of mind in them in conversation. ' It seems strange (said he) that a man should see so far to the right, who sees so short a way to the left. Burke is the only man whose common ' conversation corresponds with the general fame which he has in the world. Take up whatever topick you please, he is ready to meet you.
Page 103 - I am sure (said she) they have affected me." — " Why (said Johnson, smiling, and rolling himself about) that is, because, dearest, you're a dunce.
Page 211 - That the influence of the Crown has increased, is increasing, and ought to be diminished ? ' " JOHNSON : " Sir, I have never slept an hour less, nor ate an ounce less meat.
Page 88 - And, behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom ; and the earth did quake, and the rocks rent; and the graves were opened; and many bodies of the saints which slept arose, and came out of the graves after his resurrection, and went into the holy city, and appeared unto many.
Page 70 - See, what a grace was seated on this brow : Hyperion's curls; the front of Jove himself; An eye like Mars, to threaten and command ; A station like the herald Mercury New-lighted on a heaven-kissing hill ; A combination, and a form, indeed, Where every god did seem to. set his seal, To give the world assurance of a man : This was your husband.
Page 101 - Aristotle such persons are termed cmSefioi. dextrous men and fvrpoTroi, men of facile or versatile manners, who can easily turn themselves to all things, or turn all things to themselves.) It also procureth delight by gratifying curiosity with its rareness or semblance of difficulty (as monsters, not for their beauty but their rarity ; as juggling tricks, not for their use but their abstruseness, are beheld with pleasure) ; by diverting the mind from its road of serious thoughts; by instilling gaiety...
Page 41 - After all this, it is surely superfluous to answer the question that has once been asked, Whether Pope was a poet, otherwise than by asking in return, If Pope be not a poet, where is poetry to be found?

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