Journal of the Franklin Institute

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Pergamon Press, 1852 - Electronic journals
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Vols. 1-69 include more or less complete patent reports of the U. S. Patent Office for years 1825-1859. cf. Index to v. 1-120 of the Journal, p. [415]
 

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Page 425 - The Committee on Science and the Arts constituted by the Franklin Institute of the State of Pennsylvania, for the promotion of the Mechanic Arts, to whom was referred for examination a Solar Compass, invented by WM.
Page 241 - Claim. — Having thus fully described the nature of my invention, what I claim therein as new and desire to secure by letters patent is...
Page 157 - Carriages drawn by horses. 8 That, as they admit of greater breadth of tire than other Carriages, and as the roads are not acted on so injuriously as by the feet of horses in common draught, such Carriages will cause less wear of roads than coaches drawn by horses.
Page 279 - Philadelphia. The Periodicals received in exchange for the Journal of the Institute, were laid on the table. The Treasurer read his statement of the receipts and payments for the month of February.
Page 174 - Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim therein as new and desire to secure by letters patent is . . . Second. I claim striking or forming the hollow rim at one stroke or operation, as above set forth and described.
Page 279 - Isaac B. Garrigues, Recording Secretary. The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.
Page 109 - ... that line along which, if a transverse wire be moved in either direction, there is no tendency to the formation of any current in the wire, whilst if moved in any other direction there is such a tendency...
Page 398 - ... moisture, which takes place during the night, when the instrument is most in use. Its exterior is of bright metal, the interior is painted black. The focal distance will vary from 76 to 85 feet. The tube at its greatest circumference measures 13 feet, and this part is about 24 feet from the object glass. The determination of this point was the result of repeated experiments and minute and careful calculations. It was essential to the object in view that there should not be the slightest vibration...
Page 199 - This is not the case when the reflection of an object is seen in a mirror; for then, not only are the projections separately reflected, but they are also transposed from one eye to the other, and therefore the conversion of relief does not take place. The pseudoscope being directed to an object, and adjusted so that the object shall appear of its proper size, and at its usual distance, the distances of all other objects are inverted; all nearer objects appear more distant, and all more distant objects...
Page 78 - ... the strength and resisting powers of an iron ship, and that under every contingency and every circumstance in which the vessel can be placed. Moreover, it will give a wide margin of security under all those forms and conditions of peril to which every vessel navigating the ocean is exposed.

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