The Quarterly Review, Volume 116

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John Murray, 1864 - English literature
 

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Page 74 - That very law* which moulds a tear, And bids it trickle from its source, That law preserves the earth a sphere, And guides the planets in their course.
Page 166 - And to the angel of the church in Philadelphia write; These things saith he that is holy, he that is true, he that hath the key of David, he that openeth, and no man shutteth ; and shutteth, and no man openeth...
Page 549 - I believe that it had some influence on my opinions, in the direction of those childish imaginations which I have already mentioned, viz. in isolating me from the objects which surrounded me, in confirming me in my mistrust of the reality of material phenomena, and making me rest in the thought of two and two only supreme and luminously self-evident beings, myself and my Creator; — for while I considered myself predestined to salvation, I thought others simply passed over, not predestined to eternal...
Page 539 - The Bible and the Bible only is the religion of Protestants;" and he gloried in accepting Tradition as a main instrument of religious teaching. He had a high severe idea of the intrinsic excellence of Virginity ; and he considered the Blessed Virgin its great Pattern.
Page 72 - Since the mind, in all its thoughts and reasonings, hath no other immediate object but its own ideas, which it alone does or can contemplate, it is evident that our knowledge is only conversant about them. 2. Knowledge is the Perception of the Agreement or Disagreement of two Ideas.
Page 145 - The History of Our Lord, as exemplified in Works of Art; with that of His Types in the Old and New Testament. By Mrs. JAMESON and Lady EASTLAKE. Being the concluding Series of ' Sacred and Legendary Art;' with 13 Etchings and 281 Woodcuts.
Page 482 - Sir Walter breathed his last, in the presence of all his children. It was a beautiful day — so warm, that every window was wide open — and so perfectly still, that the sound of all others most delicious to his ear, the gentle ripple of the Tweed over its pebbles, was distinctly audible as we knelt around the bed, and his eldest son kissed and closed his eyes.
Page 81 - The peace and tranquillity of the nation, and regards even above those, are so much concerned in this matter, that it is difficult to express sufficient sorrow for the offender, or indignation against him. But if ever man deserved to be denied the common benefits of air and water, it is the author of A Discourse of Freethinking.
Page 461 - ... being, he said, what he had always practised when a young housekeeper, and in his opinion far superior in its results to any application of ice : and in the same spirit, whenever the weather was sufficiently genial, he voted for dining out of doors altogether...
Page 460 - at Chiefswood " my wife and I spent this summer and autumn of 1821 ; the first of several seasons which will ever dwell on my memory as the happiest of my life. We were near enough Abbotsford to partake as often as we liked of its brilliant and constantly varying society ; yet could do so without being exposed to the worry and exhaustion of spirit which the daily reception of newcomers entailed upon all the family, except Sir Walter himself.

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