Historic Sites and Other Remarkable and Interesting Places in the County of Suffolk

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Longman, Orme, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1839 - Suffolk (England) - 300 pages
 

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Page 125 - I do love these ancient ruins. We never tread upon them but we set Our foot upon some reverend history; And, questionless, here in this open court, Which now lies naked to the injuries Of stormy weather, some men lie...
Page 51 - At which sight the sheriff wept apace, and so did divers others of the company. After they had prayed, he rose up and kissed his wife, and shook her by the hand, and said : Farewell, my dear wife, be of good comfort, for I am quiet in my conscience. God shall stir up a father for my children.
Page 65 - He was a scholar, and a ripe and good one ; Exceeding wise, fair spoken, and persuading : Lofty and sour to them that loved him not ; But, to those men that sought him, sweet as summer; And though he were unsatisfied in getting (Which was a sin), yet in bestowing, madam, He was most princely. Ever witness for him Those twins of learning that he raised in yon, Ipswich and Oxford ! one of which fell with him, Unwilling to outlive the good that did it; The other, though unfinish'd, yet so famous, So...
Page 267 - For time has soften'd what was harsh when new And now the stains are all of sober hue; The living stains which Nature's hand alone, Profuse of life, pours forth upon the stone: For ever growing; where the common eye Can but the bare and rocky bed descry ; There Science loves to trace her tribes minute, The juiceless foliage, and the tasteless fruit ; There she perceives them round the surface creep, And while they meet their due distinction keep; Mix'd but not blended; each its name retains, And...
Page 259 - I am coward enough to dread such an end to my suspense. Can you, sir, in any degree aid me with propriety ? Will you ask any demonstrations of my veracity ? I have imposed upon myself, but I have been guilty of no other imposition. Let me, if possible, interest your compassion.
Page 50 - And in going up to his chamber, he still said ; God deliver me from you, God deliver me from you. And when he came up, he told master Bradford, for then both lay in one chamber, that he had made the bishop of London afraid : For...
Page 92 - Noble madam, Men's evil manners live in brass; their virtues We write in water.
Page 52 - Then lifted he up his eyes towards heaven, and prayed for his son, laid his hand upon the child's head, and blessed him, and so delivered the child to John Hull, whom he took by the hand, and said; Farewell John Hull, the faithfulest servant that ever man had.
Page 123 - Gentlemen, when I was young and thoughtless, and out of money, I and some companions, as unthinking as myself, went to this woman's house, then a public one, and having no money to pay our reckoning I hit upon a stratagem to get off scot-free.
Page 259 - ... propriety ? Will you ask any demonstrations of my veracity ? I have imposed upon myself, but I have been guilty of no other imposition. Let me, if possible, interest your compassion. I know those of rank and fortune are teased with frequent petitions, and are compelled to refuse the requests even of those whom they know to be in distress ; it is. therefore, with a distant hope I ventured to solicit such favor ; but you will forgive me, sir, if you do not think proper to relieve.

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