Aus Schleiermacher's leben: bd. Schleiermachers briefe an Brinckmann. Briefwechsel mit seinen freunden von seiner uebersiedlung nach Halle bis zu seinem tode. Denkschriften. Dialog über das anständige. Recensionen. Vorbereitet von Ludwig Jonas, hrsg. von Wilhelm Dilthey

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Page 579 - Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off ; And pity, like a naked new-born babe, Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubin, hors'd Upon the sightless couriers of the air, Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye, That tears shall drown the wind.
Page 311 - Pursue the triumph, and partake the gale ? When statesmen, heroes, kings, in dust repose Whose sons shall blush their fathers were thy foes, Shall then this verse to future age pretend Thou wert my guide, philosopher, and friend...
Page 580 - If good, why do I yield to that suggestion Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair, And make my seated heart knock at my ribs. Against the use of nature ? Present fears Are less than horrible imaginings : My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical, Shakes so my single state of man, that function Is smother'd in surmise ; and nothing is, But what is not.
Page 577 - Glamis thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be What thou art promised. Yet do I fear thy nature; It is too full o' the milk of human kindness To catch the nearest way. Thou wouldst be great, Art not without ambition, but without The illness should attend it. What thou wouldst highly That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false, And yet wouldst wrongly win. Thou'dst have, great Glamis, that which cries, "Thus thou must do, if thou have it, And that which rather thou dost fear to do Than wishest should...
Page 31 - AM by no means surprised that the interview yon have lately had with Cleanthes, has given you a much lower opinion of his abilities, than what you had before conceived : and since it has raised your curiosity to know my sentiments of his character, you shall have them with all that freedom you may justly expect. I have always, then, considered...
Page 32 - ... in order to set off and recommend those of a superior nature. To know how to descend with grace and ease into ordinary occasions, and to fall in with the less important parties and purposes of mankind, is an art of more general influence, perhaps, than is usually imagined.
Page 31 - ... in order to» set off and recommend those of a superior nature. To know how to descend with grace and ease into ordinary occasions, and to fall in with the less important parties and purposes of mankind, is an art of more general influence, perhaps, than is usually imagined. ÎBenn (1ф bie [фюофе Seite fyier oon ber guten trennen íie&e : fo b,ätt' 1ф fie eben fo gut für meine eigne ©фИЬепшд geben fön* nen.
Page 31 - Cleauthes as possessed of the most extraordinary talents ; but his talents are of a kind which can only be exerted upon uncommon occasions. They are formed for the greatest depths of business and affairs ; but absolutely out of all size for the shallows of ordinary life. In circumstances that require the most profound reasonings, in incidents that demand the most penetrating politics, there Clean thes would shine with supreme lustre.
Page 31 - ... which are necessary to render a man useful or agréable in the daily commerce of the world, those great abilities which he possesses, lie unobserved or neglected. He often indeed gives one occasion to reflect how necessary it is to be master of a sort of under -qualities, in order to» set off and recommend those of a superior nature.

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