Paris as it was and as it is: or, A sketch of the French capital, illustrative of the effects of the revolution, with respect to sciences, literature, arts, religion, education, manners, and amusements; comprising also a correct account of the most remarkable national establishments and public buildings

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Page 265 - But see ! each Muse, in LEO'S golden days, Starts from her trance, and trims her wither'd bays, Rome's ancient genius, o'er its ruins spread, Shakes off the dust, and rears his reverend head. Then sculpture and her sister-arts revive ; Stones leap'd to form, and rocks began to live ; With sweeter notes each rising temple rung; A Raphael painted, and a Vida sung.
Page 106 - I saw young Harry, with his beaver on, His cuisses on his thighs, gallantly arm'd, Rise from the ground like feather'd Mercury, And vaulted with such ease into his seat As if an angel dropp'd down from the clouds, To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus, And witch the world with noble horsemanship.
Page 150 - I'm lost : Here pleasing airs my ravish'd soul confound With circling notes and labyrinths of sound ; Here domes and temples rise in distant views, And opening palaces invite my muse. How has kind...
Page 292 - Admiralty -office no other than an indifferent map of the coast could be found: as for the adjacent country, it was so little known in England, that, when the British troops landed,- their commander was ignorant of the distance of the neighbouring villages.
Page 244 - Tour vi lie on the main triumphant roll'd To meet the gallant Russell in combat o'er the deep ; He led his noble troops of heroes bold To sink the English admiral and his fleet. Now every gallant mind to victory does aspire : The bloody fight's begun — the sea is all on fire ; And mighty Fate stood looking on, Whilst the flood All with blood Fill'd the scuppers of the Rising Sun. Sulphur, smoke, and fire, disturbing the air, With thunder and wonder, affright the Gallic shore...
Page 311 - ... stated and represented to plaintiff that the capital stock of the Theatre Improvement Company . . . was •worth the sum of One Hundred Thirty ($130.00) Dollars, and of the market value of the sum of One Hundred Twenty-five ($125.00) Dollars per share, and that it was then earning and paying dividends at the rate of one-half per cent per month or six per cent per annum on the par value of One Hundred ($100.00) Dollars per share, and then and there delivered to plaintiff a certain statement which...
Page iv - Art. 5.— The Council of State is dissolved. "Art. 6. The Minister of the Interior is charged with the execution of the present decree.
Page 292 - Plymouth, he was sent for express to London, in the year 1757, in order to command the naval part of an expedition to the coast of France; George II. and the whole Cabinet Council seemed very much astonished at his requiring the production of a map of that part of the enemy's coast against which the expedition was intended. Neither in the apartment where the Council sat, nor in any adjoining one, was any such document ; even in the Admiralty Office no other than an...
Page 99 - A simple piece of linen slightly laced before, while it leaves the waist uncompressed, serves all the purpose of a corset. If a robe is worn which is not open in front, petticoats are altogether dispensed with, the cambric chemise having the semblance of one from its skirt being trimmed with lace. When attired for a ball, those who dance commonly put on a tunic, and then a petticoat becomes a matter of necessity rather than of choice. Pockets being deemed an...
Page 200 - Whether these gentlemen have discovered the true reason of this depravity, or whether the discovery lias been reserved for me, I will not pretend to determine; but certain it is, that the repeal of an act of parliament, which was meant to restrain the power of the devil by inflicting death upon his agents, must infallibly give him a much greater influence over us, than he ever could have hoped for, during the continuance of such an act. I am well aware that there are certain of my...

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