Silvershell, Or, The Adventures of an Oyster

Front Cover
Judd & Glass, Gray's Inn Road, and 21 Paternoster Row, 1857 - Evolution (Biology) - 184 pages
Anecdotal natural history for children in which the author discusses the wonders of the oyster and its assorted cousings. Darwin is only mentioned in passing, but Williams addresses the theory of evolution and dismisses it as an absurdity.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 148 - What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed? a beast, no more. Sure he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust in us unus'd.
Page 99 - Not a penny. I have been content, sir, you should lay my countenance to pawn : I have grated upon my good friends for three reprieves for you and your coach-fellow, Nym ; or else you had looked through the grate, like a geminy of baboons.
Page 181 - The one led me to see a system in every star. The other leads me to see a world in every atom.
Page 25 - In human works, though laboured on with pain, A thousand movements scarce one purpose gain; In God's, one single can its end produce; Yet serves to second too some other use.
Page 149 - Him, who maketh the morning and the evening to rejoice over our heads ; who " openeth his hand, and satisfieth the desire of every living thing.
Page 36 - But I have sinuous shells, of pearly hue Within, and they that lustre have imbibed In the sun's palace porch; where when unyoked His chariot wheel stands midway in the wave. Shake one, and it awakens, then apply Its polished lips to your attentive ear, And it remembers its august abodes, And murmurs as the ocean murmurs there.
Page 100 - He is our cousin, cousin ; but 'tis doubt, When time shall call him home from banishment, Whether our kinsman come to see his friends. Ourself, and Bushy, Bagot here, and Green, Observ'd his courtship to the common people:— How he did seem to dive into their hearts...
Page 173 - Which strike ev'n eyes incurious ; but each moss, Each shell, each crawling insect, holds a rank Important in the plan of Him who framed This scale of beings ; holds a rank which lost Would break the chain, and leave behind a gap Which Nature's self would rue.
Page 155 - ... and proceeded in the most gentle manner to introduce Luidia to the purer element. Whether the cold air was too much for him or the sight of the bucket too terrific I know not, but in a moment he proceeded to dissolve his corporation, and at every mesh of the dredge his fragments were seen escaping. In despair I grasped at the largest, and brought up the extremity of an arm with its terminating eye, the spinous eyelid of which opened and closed with something exceedingly like a wink of derision.
Page 148 - Thus all lower natures find their highest good in semblances and seekings of that which is higher and better. All things strive to ascend, and ascend in their striving. And shall man alone stoop? Shall his pursuits and desires, the reflections of his inward life, be like the reflected image of a tree on the edge of a pool, that grows downward, and seeks a mock heaven in the unstable element beneath it, in...

Bibliographic information